Poster Title

Serum Biochemical and Hematological Profiles in Sheep After Oral Administration of the Anthelminics, Eprinomectin and Moxidectin

Institution

Morehead State University

Abstract

Parasitism in small ruminants is the most economically devastating disease today in the United States. As parasites, such as haemonchus contortus, become increasingly resistant to common anthelminic agents, newer anthelminics, such as eprinomectin and moxidectin, are receiving more use by sheep and goat producers. Eprinomectin and moxidectin belong to the class of anthelminics known as macrocyclic lactones. Although eprinomectin and moxidectin have demonstrated an excellent safety record in beef and dairy cattle, there is no specific data on their effect on the physiologic and biochemical functions of sheep. It was the purpose of this study to demonstrate the safety of eprinomectin and moxidectin in sheep. Fifteen (15) ewes ranging in age from 1-2 years of age were selected from the Morehead State University Sheep Program. Five of the ewes served as controls and received a placebo (sterile plantbased oil), orally. Ten ewes were assigned to two treatment groups of five animals each. One treatment group received a one-time dose of eprinomectin (1ml / 22lbs. body weight) orally. The other treatment group received a one-time dose of moxidectin (1ml / 22lbs. body weight) orally. Blood samples from both groups were obtained pre-treatment and at 48 hours, 7 days, and 14 days post-treatment. Hematological and biochemical analysis included complete white and red blood cell counts, hemoglobin content, liver and kidney function parameters, serumglucose, total protein, and electrolytes. Statistical analysis of these groups (hematological and biochemical profile analysis) demonstrated no significant differences between pre- and post-medication in control, eprinomectin treated, or moxidectin treated animals. No overt clinical side effects were noted in the control or treatment groups of sheep. These results indicate that oral administration of the anthelminics eprinomectin and moxidectin may be safe and effective for small ruminants in its current formulation and could be a marketable drug for sheep and goat producers, pending approval by the FDA.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Serum Biochemical and Hematological Profiles in Sheep After Oral Administration of the Anthelminics, Eprinomectin and Moxidectin

Parasitism in small ruminants is the most economically devastating disease today in the United States. As parasites, such as haemonchus contortus, become increasingly resistant to common anthelminic agents, newer anthelminics, such as eprinomectin and moxidectin, are receiving more use by sheep and goat producers. Eprinomectin and moxidectin belong to the class of anthelminics known as macrocyclic lactones. Although eprinomectin and moxidectin have demonstrated an excellent safety record in beef and dairy cattle, there is no specific data on their effect on the physiologic and biochemical functions of sheep. It was the purpose of this study to demonstrate the safety of eprinomectin and moxidectin in sheep. Fifteen (15) ewes ranging in age from 1-2 years of age were selected from the Morehead State University Sheep Program. Five of the ewes served as controls and received a placebo (sterile plantbased oil), orally. Ten ewes were assigned to two treatment groups of five animals each. One treatment group received a one-time dose of eprinomectin (1ml / 22lbs. body weight) orally. The other treatment group received a one-time dose of moxidectin (1ml / 22lbs. body weight) orally. Blood samples from both groups were obtained pre-treatment and at 48 hours, 7 days, and 14 days post-treatment. Hematological and biochemical analysis included complete white and red blood cell counts, hemoglobin content, liver and kidney function parameters, serumglucose, total protein, and electrolytes. Statistical analysis of these groups (hematological and biochemical profile analysis) demonstrated no significant differences between pre- and post-medication in control, eprinomectin treated, or moxidectin treated animals. No overt clinical side effects were noted in the control or treatment groups of sheep. These results indicate that oral administration of the anthelminics eprinomectin and moxidectin may be safe and effective for small ruminants in its current formulation and could be a marketable drug for sheep and goat producers, pending approval by the FDA.