Poster Title

Creating a Historical Archival System for an Active Military Division.

Institution

Murray State University

Abstract

The Don F. Pratt Museum on Ft. Campbell, Kentucky keeps the 101st Airborne Division's triumphs and sacrifices alive, but holds an even greater responsibility to those serving the 101st Division. Through a proper archival system, the museum preserves artifacts and documents brought back from military operations. Beginning in October 2001 and ending August 2002, I had the honor of interning at the Pratt Museum. Originally assigned to learn various aspects of museum administration, my task narrowed to archiving all documents brought back from Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm. Before Operation Anaconda, the database and archival system I was maintaining became a utilized source to find information on equipment that was to be used in desert conditions. Having first hand resources available for quick reference allowed those responsible for transporting equipment to alter shipments that would have otherwise been rendered useless upon arrival in Afghanistan. The database also became a quick reference tool for those in charge of soldiers on the battlefield to compare conditions and situations experienced during the Gulf War. While not yet a complete system, the database is now viewed as helpful tool for lessons learned in preparation for training and potential unit deployment.

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Creating a Historical Archival System for an Active Military Division.

The Don F. Pratt Museum on Ft. Campbell, Kentucky keeps the 101st Airborne Division's triumphs and sacrifices alive, but holds an even greater responsibility to those serving the 101st Division. Through a proper archival system, the museum preserves artifacts and documents brought back from military operations. Beginning in October 2001 and ending August 2002, I had the honor of interning at the Pratt Museum. Originally assigned to learn various aspects of museum administration, my task narrowed to archiving all documents brought back from Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm. Before Operation Anaconda, the database and archival system I was maintaining became a utilized source to find information on equipment that was to be used in desert conditions. Having first hand resources available for quick reference allowed those responsible for transporting equipment to alter shipments that would have otherwise been rendered useless upon arrival in Afghanistan. The database also became a quick reference tool for those in charge of soldiers on the battlefield to compare conditions and situations experienced during the Gulf War. While not yet a complete system, the database is now viewed as helpful tool for lessons learned in preparation for training and potential unit deployment.