Northern Kentucky University

Poster Title

Synthesis of a Fullerene/Transition Metal Supramolecular System

Institution

Northern Kentucky University

Abstract

Fullerenes (C60), commonly referred to as “buckyballs,” are of great photochemical interest due to their ability to accept multiple electrons and due to their large absorption cross areas. The objective of this research project is to link a C60 to a bipyridine ligand where a transition metal is attached. Previous attempts do not provide a rigid structure to link the two components. The goal is to provide a rigid, conjugated link between the two components to enhance the ability of charge to flow from the metal to the fullerene and vice-versa. To date, this link is about two-thirds complete. After accomplishing this goal, various spectroscopic techniques can be applied to the fullerene-based ligand to observe the electronic transitions within the molecule. Supramolecular systems, like this one, potentially have applications in solar cell development, molecular devices, and computers.

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Synthesis of a Fullerene/Transition Metal Supramolecular System

Fullerenes (C60), commonly referred to as “buckyballs,” are of great photochemical interest due to their ability to accept multiple electrons and due to their large absorption cross areas. The objective of this research project is to link a C60 to a bipyridine ligand where a transition metal is attached. Previous attempts do not provide a rigid structure to link the two components. The goal is to provide a rigid, conjugated link between the two components to enhance the ability of charge to flow from the metal to the fullerene and vice-versa. To date, this link is about two-thirds complete. After accomplishing this goal, various spectroscopic techniques can be applied to the fullerene-based ligand to observe the electronic transitions within the molecule. Supramolecular systems, like this one, potentially have applications in solar cell development, molecular devices, and computers.