Eastern Kentucky University

Poster Title

Mapping Mine Reclamation Areas to Introduce Beekeeping Programs

Institution

Eastern Kentucky University

Abstract

The purpose of the project is to develop a set of site selection criteria that can be used to identify good candidate mine reclamation areas that could be used for beekeeping by (a) using a geographic information system to analyze the physical and environmental characteristics of three mine reclamation areas and their suitability for beekeeping; and (b) establishing three case study hives to compare the relative success of bee colonies under different physical and environmental conditions; and (c) identifying the physical and environmental characteristics that are associated with success in the case study hives. Through a combination of remote geographic analysis and site visits, several potential study sites will be identified. Ideally, sites will be chosen to represent differing degrees of vegetation, and soil compaction. The data collected from the visits, in conjunction with satellite images and recent topographic maps, will then be digitized into a Geographic Information System database. From these field and remotely obtained data, a detailed map of each site will be generated. Hives will be placed at three different locations. The bees will then be monitored to determine how well they survive-or thrive-in each environment. In addition to mapping suitable locations to install apiaries, a document will be created that will explain how and why certain sites were chosen, information about the hives introduced at the Big Elk site, as well information about other beekeeping for rural development programs, and possibilities for obtaining funding for regional beekeeping programs.

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Mapping Mine Reclamation Areas to Introduce Beekeeping Programs

The purpose of the project is to develop a set of site selection criteria that can be used to identify good candidate mine reclamation areas that could be used for beekeeping by (a) using a geographic information system to analyze the physical and environmental characteristics of three mine reclamation areas and their suitability for beekeeping; and (b) establishing three case study hives to compare the relative success of bee colonies under different physical and environmental conditions; and (c) identifying the physical and environmental characteristics that are associated with success in the case study hives. Through a combination of remote geographic analysis and site visits, several potential study sites will be identified. Ideally, sites will be chosen to represent differing degrees of vegetation, and soil compaction. The data collected from the visits, in conjunction with satellite images and recent topographic maps, will then be digitized into a Geographic Information System database. From these field and remotely obtained data, a detailed map of each site will be generated. Hives will be placed at three different locations. The bees will then be monitored to determine how well they survive-or thrive-in each environment. In addition to mapping suitable locations to install apiaries, a document will be created that will explain how and why certain sites were chosen, information about the hives introduced at the Big Elk site, as well information about other beekeeping for rural development programs, and possibilities for obtaining funding for regional beekeeping programs.