Morehead State University

Poster Title

Sports Concussions and Depressions: A Correlational Study Utilizing Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) in Assessment and Diagnosis

Institution

Morehead State University

Abstract

A concussion is the most unrecognized injury in the world of sports. Every concussion, no matter how mild, injures the brain. This type of injury is prevalent in athletes at all levels; however, the diagnosis of such injuries is often overlooked by even the most experienced coach. A study conducted by the University of North Carolina's Center for the Study of Retired Athletes found that clinical depression was strongly related with the number of sustained concussions. Over twenty percent of the 595 players who recalled having three or more concussions said they experienced depression. The objective of this study was to correlate the number of concussions with the likelihood of developing depression among athletes. An extensive literature review and an informal survey of two world renowned neurosurgeons and a neuropathologist were conducted by the researchers. While computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging modalities are currently the tool of choice when a concussion is suspected, a definitive diagnosis cannot be provided. The application of fMRI is in the infancy stage; however it may prove useful in the correlation of concussions and depression. Based upon this research, a pilot study is in progress to determine whether there is a significant relationship between concussions and indicators of depression among high school and collegiate athletes.

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Sports Concussions and Depressions: A Correlational Study Utilizing Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) in Assessment and Diagnosis

A concussion is the most unrecognized injury in the world of sports. Every concussion, no matter how mild, injures the brain. This type of injury is prevalent in athletes at all levels; however, the diagnosis of such injuries is often overlooked by even the most experienced coach. A study conducted by the University of North Carolina's Center for the Study of Retired Athletes found that clinical depression was strongly related with the number of sustained concussions. Over twenty percent of the 595 players who recalled having three or more concussions said they experienced depression. The objective of this study was to correlate the number of concussions with the likelihood of developing depression among athletes. An extensive literature review and an informal survey of two world renowned neurosurgeons and a neuropathologist were conducted by the researchers. While computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging modalities are currently the tool of choice when a concussion is suspected, a definitive diagnosis cannot be provided. The application of fMRI is in the infancy stage; however it may prove useful in the correlation of concussions and depression. Based upon this research, a pilot study is in progress to determine whether there is a significant relationship between concussions and indicators of depression among high school and collegiate athletes.