Murray State University

Poster Title

Stabilizing Greenhouse Temperature Fluctuations with the Implementation of a Below-Bench Baffle System

Institution

Murray State University

Abstract

To produce maximum growth results in crops, certain temperatures are desired in a greenhouse. Desired temperatures can be achieved with an active air cooling system. However, airflow properties will draw the cool air downward in the center of the greenhouse. This causes inconsistent plant growth from the ends of the greenhouse to the center, with warmer bench temperatures in the middle. For this project, data will be collected over a three-month period. Temperature at each of the 32 benches will be taken at the bench and ground levels. The data will be analyzed to determine where the temperatures in the greenhouse are highest and lowest, when the temperatures are noticed to have changed and by what margins, and whether or not there is a set pattern to the temperature fluctuations. To manage the cool airflow, baffles will be constructed out of VC, plastic painter's drop cloth, and secured with duct tape. First, the temperature readings will need to be analyzed and a calculated placement of the baffles determined. Second, new readings will be taken to determine the effect of these placements, as well as make any needed adjustments in the placements. The process will be refined until the desired bench-top temperatures are achieved. Depending on the results of the study, a permanent baffle system will be constructed in the Pullen Farm Greenhouse Complex at Murray State University and further research will be conducted.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Stabilizing Greenhouse Temperature Fluctuations with the Implementation of a Below-Bench Baffle System

To produce maximum growth results in crops, certain temperatures are desired in a greenhouse. Desired temperatures can be achieved with an active air cooling system. However, airflow properties will draw the cool air downward in the center of the greenhouse. This causes inconsistent plant growth from the ends of the greenhouse to the center, with warmer bench temperatures in the middle. For this project, data will be collected over a three-month period. Temperature at each of the 32 benches will be taken at the bench and ground levels. The data will be analyzed to determine where the temperatures in the greenhouse are highest and lowest, when the temperatures are noticed to have changed and by what margins, and whether or not there is a set pattern to the temperature fluctuations. To manage the cool airflow, baffles will be constructed out of VC, plastic painter's drop cloth, and secured with duct tape. First, the temperature readings will need to be analyzed and a calculated placement of the baffles determined. Second, new readings will be taken to determine the effect of these placements, as well as make any needed adjustments in the placements. The process will be refined until the desired bench-top temperatures are achieved. Depending on the results of the study, a permanent baffle system will be constructed in the Pullen Farm Greenhouse Complex at Murray State University and further research will be conducted.