University of Kentucky

Poster Title

STUDY 1: Control of Enzyme Bioactivity through Attachment to Charged Tether Anchored on Carbon Nanotube Membrane

Institution

University of Kentucky

Abstract

Carbon nanotube membranes are comprised of aligned carbon nanotubes extending through a thin layer of polystyrene. By using a charged molecule attached to one side of the carbon nanotube membrane, with an enzyme attached to the opposite end, the enzyme can be extended and retracted through the application of an electric field. Upon application of the electric field, the charged tether was pulled to the surface of the membrane and with it the attached enzyme. Upon removal of the electric field, the tether extended due to like charge interactions and pushed the enzyme away from the membrane's surface. Carbon nanotube membranes are able to transport selected fluid molecules quickly by permitting them to flow through the nanotube's interior. The use of a charged tether with accompanying enzyme would allow for successful metering of the membrane's flow rate. The flow through the membrane could be halted by applying an electric potential, which would obstruct the nanotubes with a bulky enzyme. Since many blood chemical detectors use enzymes for measurement, enzymes attached to carbon nanotube membranes could be used as indicating and drug delivery device in one compact unit in the form of a skin patch.

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STUDY 1: Control of Enzyme Bioactivity through Attachment to Charged Tether Anchored on Carbon Nanotube Membrane

Carbon nanotube membranes are comprised of aligned carbon nanotubes extending through a thin layer of polystyrene. By using a charged molecule attached to one side of the carbon nanotube membrane, with an enzyme attached to the opposite end, the enzyme can be extended and retracted through the application of an electric field. Upon application of the electric field, the charged tether was pulled to the surface of the membrane and with it the attached enzyme. Upon removal of the electric field, the tether extended due to like charge interactions and pushed the enzyme away from the membrane's surface. Carbon nanotube membranes are able to transport selected fluid molecules quickly by permitting them to flow through the nanotube's interior. The use of a charged tether with accompanying enzyme would allow for successful metering of the membrane's flow rate. The flow through the membrane could be halted by applying an electric potential, which would obstruct the nanotubes with a bulky enzyme. Since many blood chemical detectors use enzymes for measurement, enzymes attached to carbon nanotube membranes could be used as indicating and drug delivery device in one compact unit in the form of a skin patch.