University of Kentucky

Poster Title

Nanocomposite Biodegradable Polymers: Preparation and the Analysis of Heating, Degradation, and Drug Release

Institution

University of Kentucky

Abstract

Biodegradable polymers are extremely versatile materials that can be used in many drug delivery applications, but current materials exhibit degradation profiles that are preprogrammed. Thus, there is limited or no ability to modulate the degradation once it is applied (e.g., implant, subcutaneous injection, etc.). In this research, nanocomposite biodegradable polymers have been designed and developed that exhibit degradation profiles that can be remotely controlled by an alternating magnetic field. In particular, poly(lactide-co-glycolide) films and biodegradable hydrogel films have been prepared that contain iron oxide nanoparticles as well as several model drugs. The magnetic nanoparticles allow heating of the films, which can therefore affect many of the other properties of the polymer (e.g., degradation rate). Thus, the degradation driven drug release can be controlled by altering the degradation rate through remotely heating the nanoparticles, therefore allowing external control over the properties and drug release of an implanted device. PLGA films with and without nanoparticles (and drugs) were successfully prepared. The heating due to the particles was then studied, degradation rates of the films were analyzed, and finally several drug release studies were conducted using UV-Vis analysis. Further studies were conducted using biodegradable hydrogel networks. Once polymerized, it was shown that these systems had degradation rates dependent on temperature. Nanocomposite films containing iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized, and their heating properties and degradation were studied. As with the PLGA, different drug molecules were incorporated into these hydrogel systems, and the release was studied using the same methods as described above.

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Nanocomposite Biodegradable Polymers: Preparation and the Analysis of Heating, Degradation, and Drug Release

Biodegradable polymers are extremely versatile materials that can be used in many drug delivery applications, but current materials exhibit degradation profiles that are preprogrammed. Thus, there is limited or no ability to modulate the degradation once it is applied (e.g., implant, subcutaneous injection, etc.). In this research, nanocomposite biodegradable polymers have been designed and developed that exhibit degradation profiles that can be remotely controlled by an alternating magnetic field. In particular, poly(lactide-co-glycolide) films and biodegradable hydrogel films have been prepared that contain iron oxide nanoparticles as well as several model drugs. The magnetic nanoparticles allow heating of the films, which can therefore affect many of the other properties of the polymer (e.g., degradation rate). Thus, the degradation driven drug release can be controlled by altering the degradation rate through remotely heating the nanoparticles, therefore allowing external control over the properties and drug release of an implanted device. PLGA films with and without nanoparticles (and drugs) were successfully prepared. The heating due to the particles was then studied, degradation rates of the films were analyzed, and finally several drug release studies were conducted using UV-Vis analysis. Further studies were conducted using biodegradable hydrogel networks. Once polymerized, it was shown that these systems had degradation rates dependent on temperature. Nanocomposite films containing iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized, and their heating properties and degradation were studied. As with the PLGA, different drug molecules were incorporated into these hydrogel systems, and the release was studied using the same methods as described above.