University of Kentucky

Poster Title

Transdermal Capabilities of Clonidine for Opiate Withdrawal

Institution

University of Kentucky

Abstract

Opiate is used to describe drugs derived from opium such as morphine, heroin, and codeine. The discontinuation of opiates from the human body can cause an excess in excited locus coeruleus neurons (located in the brainstem), the reason for physical symptoms of withdrawal. Clonidine, a direct acting alpha-2 noradrenergic agonist, is able to lessen withdrawal distress for addicts and therefore improve the withdrawal process. The opiate withdrawal dosing regimen is complex in which it requires multiple oral doses multiple times a day and then gradually tapering over at least a five day period. Transdermal delivery over oral dosing is preferred because it is easier to follow with such a complex schedule. This drug could be delivered transdermally varying the amounts of drug released into the blood thus eliminating the withdrawal symptoms of an opiate addict. In order to use clonidine via a transdermal delivery route, the therapeutic feasibility needed to be determined. Desired flux rates were reached and profiles of concentrations are linear. Therefore, clonidine can be tested in a patch system involving a carbon nanotube membrane. This membrane system, in the future, will include an electrical bias to allow the transdermal delivery system to be programmable, dispensing clonidine in set concentrations as required in the dosing regimen.

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Transdermal Capabilities of Clonidine for Opiate Withdrawal

Opiate is used to describe drugs derived from opium such as morphine, heroin, and codeine. The discontinuation of opiates from the human body can cause an excess in excited locus coeruleus neurons (located in the brainstem), the reason for physical symptoms of withdrawal. Clonidine, a direct acting alpha-2 noradrenergic agonist, is able to lessen withdrawal distress for addicts and therefore improve the withdrawal process. The opiate withdrawal dosing regimen is complex in which it requires multiple oral doses multiple times a day and then gradually tapering over at least a five day period. Transdermal delivery over oral dosing is preferred because it is easier to follow with such a complex schedule. This drug could be delivered transdermally varying the amounts of drug released into the blood thus eliminating the withdrawal symptoms of an opiate addict. In order to use clonidine via a transdermal delivery route, the therapeutic feasibility needed to be determined. Desired flux rates were reached and profiles of concentrations are linear. Therefore, clonidine can be tested in a patch system involving a carbon nanotube membrane. This membrane system, in the future, will include an electrical bias to allow the transdermal delivery system to be programmable, dispensing clonidine in set concentrations as required in the dosing regimen.