University of Louisville

Poster Title

An Analysis of Parental Behaviors and Anxiety in Black and White Young Adults

Institution

University of Louisville

Abstract

The literature indicates that anxiety is highly familial. However, studies have indicated that genetics only accounts for a portion of the transmission factors involved in the development of anxiety. The recent literature has indicated that psychosocial variables have received increased attention. One psychosocial variable that has received a substantial amount of attention in the literature related to anxiety is the construct of parental control. Although the literature consistently supports this notion, the samples have been predominantly Caucasian in nature with little information about ethnic minority populations, particularly African Americans. The parenting literature delineates psychosocial variables that may be related to negative outcomes in offspring. Specifically, the parenting literature indicates that there are two forms of parental control: psychological and behavioral control. Psychological control refers to a parent's attempts to control the child's psychological development and is related to internalizing disorders such as anxiety and depression. Behavioral control refers to the rules, regulations, and restrictions that parents have for their children and this has been implicated in externalizing disorders, such as conduct disorder. Given that African American parents have been shown to display more behavioral control than Caucasian parents it is important to determine if these parenting behaviors have a negative impact on their children. As such, the current study sought to investigate differences in anxiety symptoms and parenting behaviors in a sample of African American and Caucasian adults. First, it was hypothesized that Blacks and Whites will significantly differ in anxiety symptoms. Specifically, Whites will endorse more anxiety symptoms than Blacks. Secondly Blacks ands Whites will significantly differ in reported parental firm control. Specifically, Blacks will report significantly more firm control from both parents than Whites. Third Blacks and Whites will significantly differ in reported parental psychological control. Specifically, Whites will report significantly more psychological control from both parents than Blacks. Our exploratory hypothesis was that psychological control will predict current anxiety symptoms in the White sample, but not in the Black sample.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

An Analysis of Parental Behaviors and Anxiety in Black and White Young Adults

The literature indicates that anxiety is highly familial. However, studies have indicated that genetics only accounts for a portion of the transmission factors involved in the development of anxiety. The recent literature has indicated that psychosocial variables have received increased attention. One psychosocial variable that has received a substantial amount of attention in the literature related to anxiety is the construct of parental control. Although the literature consistently supports this notion, the samples have been predominantly Caucasian in nature with little information about ethnic minority populations, particularly African Americans. The parenting literature delineates psychosocial variables that may be related to negative outcomes in offspring. Specifically, the parenting literature indicates that there are two forms of parental control: psychological and behavioral control. Psychological control refers to a parent's attempts to control the child's psychological development and is related to internalizing disorders such as anxiety and depression. Behavioral control refers to the rules, regulations, and restrictions that parents have for their children and this has been implicated in externalizing disorders, such as conduct disorder. Given that African American parents have been shown to display more behavioral control than Caucasian parents it is important to determine if these parenting behaviors have a negative impact on their children. As such, the current study sought to investigate differences in anxiety symptoms and parenting behaviors in a sample of African American and Caucasian adults. First, it was hypothesized that Blacks and Whites will significantly differ in anxiety symptoms. Specifically, Whites will endorse more anxiety symptoms than Blacks. Secondly Blacks ands Whites will significantly differ in reported parental firm control. Specifically, Blacks will report significantly more firm control from both parents than Whites. Third Blacks and Whites will significantly differ in reported parental psychological control. Specifically, Whites will report significantly more psychological control from both parents than Blacks. Our exploratory hypothesis was that psychological control will predict current anxiety symptoms in the White sample, but not in the Black sample.