Eastern Kentucky University

Poster Title

Attitudes Towards and Perceptions of Human Papillomavirus and the Gardasil Vaccination

Institution

Eastern Kentucky University

Abstract

Over 10,000 women in the United States are diagnosed with cervical cancer with nearly 4,000 dying each year. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is considered one of the most serious diseases associated with cervical cancer. The purpose of this research was to determine college students’ knowledge and perceptions of HPV and legislative and educational factors associated with HPV. Using data from a representative sample of 400 Eastern Kentucky University students collected in the summer 2008, I determined that there were important gender, racial, and contextual differences in levels of knowledge about HPV and Gardasil vaccinations and support for mandatory Gardasil vaccinations. Whites, females, sexually active students, parents, respondents with health insurance, and those who practiced safe sex were more knowledgeable about Gardasil while Blacks and students without children were more supportive of the mandatory Gardasil vaccination. Policy implications from this research are also discussed.

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Attitudes Towards and Perceptions of Human Papillomavirus and the Gardasil Vaccination

Over 10,000 women in the United States are diagnosed with cervical cancer with nearly 4,000 dying each year. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is considered one of the most serious diseases associated with cervical cancer. The purpose of this research was to determine college students’ knowledge and perceptions of HPV and legislative and educational factors associated with HPV. Using data from a representative sample of 400 Eastern Kentucky University students collected in the summer 2008, I determined that there were important gender, racial, and contextual differences in levels of knowledge about HPV and Gardasil vaccinations and support for mandatory Gardasil vaccinations. Whites, females, sexually active students, parents, respondents with health insurance, and those who practiced safe sex were more knowledgeable about Gardasil while Blacks and students without children were more supportive of the mandatory Gardasil vaccination. Policy implications from this research are also discussed.