Eastern Kentucky University

Poster Title

American Women: Twentieth Century Compositional Pioneers

Institution

Eastern Kentucky University

Abstract

Throughout the ages, women have been restricted in many areas – socially, educationally, politically and occupationally. The latter includes the field of music in Twentieth Century United States. This poster will examine two representative and successful women composers of the century. Amy Marcy Cheney Beach was a musical child prodigy. Her blossoming career as a concert pianist was temporarily halted when she married Dr. H. H. A. Beach, who allowed her to compose, but preferred that she not perform in public. After his death in 1910, she returned to performing, pursuing her dreams until her death in 1944. Beach’s Symphony in E Minor (Gaelic) was a landmark in her life and in the history of women everywhere. It was the first symphony composed by an American woman to be performed by any orchestra. She successfully crossed a new frontier! Elinor Remick Warren (1900-1991) was also a musical child prodigy. Painfully shy but intellectually precocious, Warren’s career remains one of the longest and most prolific in American musical history. She had over 200 published compositions including works for orchestra, chorus and orchestra, chamber ensemble, piano, solo voice, and chorus. Usually supportive, Elinor’s parents were reluctant to allow her to move to New York City to study but relented in the face of her fierce determination. Determination and devotion to excellence were characteristic of Warren’s life and career! Art Songs are particularly important in her extensive output and this poster examines two songs by Warren.

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American Women: Twentieth Century Compositional Pioneers

Throughout the ages, women have been restricted in many areas – socially, educationally, politically and occupationally. The latter includes the field of music in Twentieth Century United States. This poster will examine two representative and successful women composers of the century. Amy Marcy Cheney Beach was a musical child prodigy. Her blossoming career as a concert pianist was temporarily halted when she married Dr. H. H. A. Beach, who allowed her to compose, but preferred that she not perform in public. After his death in 1910, she returned to performing, pursuing her dreams until her death in 1944. Beach’s Symphony in E Minor (Gaelic) was a landmark in her life and in the history of women everywhere. It was the first symphony composed by an American woman to be performed by any orchestra. She successfully crossed a new frontier! Elinor Remick Warren (1900-1991) was also a musical child prodigy. Painfully shy but intellectually precocious, Warren’s career remains one of the longest and most prolific in American musical history. She had over 200 published compositions including works for orchestra, chorus and orchestra, chamber ensemble, piano, solo voice, and chorus. Usually supportive, Elinor’s parents were reluctant to allow her to move to New York City to study but relented in the face of her fierce determination. Determination and devotion to excellence were characteristic of Warren’s life and career! Art Songs are particularly important in her extensive output and this poster examines two songs by Warren.