Kentucky State University

Poster Title

Edge Effect on Native and Invasive Plant Communities in Areas of Differing Land Use

Institution

Kentucky State University

Abstract

Habitat fragmentation and proximity to an edge affects native plants by altering the chemical and physical environment and typically aids in the establishment of invasive plant species. This study investigated the edge effect on soil and air temperature, wind velocity, canopy opening, light, and native and invasive plants using transects into remnant forest patches in urban, agricultural, and post-agricultural sites. Soil and air temperature, light, canopy opening, and wind speed essentially decreased along the transect at all sites. The invasive plant, bush honeysuckle (Lonicera mackii) decreased along the transect and the abundance rapidly declined at 6-9 meters from the edge while garlic mustard (Aralia petiolata) abundance increased along the transect. Urban sites had the highest number of invasive plants followed by active agricultural sites and the postagricultural site. The results of this study may be used in management decisions to create a buffer zone for bush honeysuckle in remnant forest patches.

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Edge Effect on Native and Invasive Plant Communities in Areas of Differing Land Use

Habitat fragmentation and proximity to an edge affects native plants by altering the chemical and physical environment and typically aids in the establishment of invasive plant species. This study investigated the edge effect on soil and air temperature, wind velocity, canopy opening, light, and native and invasive plants using transects into remnant forest patches in urban, agricultural, and post-agricultural sites. Soil and air temperature, light, canopy opening, and wind speed essentially decreased along the transect at all sites. The invasive plant, bush honeysuckle (Lonicera mackii) decreased along the transect and the abundance rapidly declined at 6-9 meters from the edge while garlic mustard (Aralia petiolata) abundance increased along the transect. Urban sites had the highest number of invasive plants followed by active agricultural sites and the postagricultural site. The results of this study may be used in management decisions to create a buffer zone for bush honeysuckle in remnant forest patches.