Kentucky State University

Poster Title

Effect of Planting Date on Biomass and Glucosinolate Production by Brassica Juncea Cover Crops

Institution

Kentucky State University

Abstract

Indian mustard, Brassica juncea (L.) Czern., can be used as a cover crop in agricultural systems to reduce emerging weed populations and build soil organic matter content. It contains glucosinolates, which have attracted some attention for their potential to suppress certain pests and soil-borne diseases, including white mold, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary. We conducted a study to gauge the effect of planting date on B. juncea biomass and glucosinolate production in Kentucky. Weather permitting, B. juncea var. ‘Pacific Gold’ was direct seeded weekly between 24 April and 3 July, 2008 in three replicated 10 m2 plots. Aboveground biomass was collected for measurements of fresh weight, dry weight, and glucosinolate content. Biomass production (y in g m-2) declined with planting date (x, where 24 Apr = 0) according to the equation y = -38.7x + 1916. The final two plantings failed to establish. We conclude that B. juncea var. ‘Pacific Gold’ is best planted in early spring, and is not a suitable summer cover crop for Kentucky.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Effect of Planting Date on Biomass and Glucosinolate Production by Brassica Juncea Cover Crops

Indian mustard, Brassica juncea (L.) Czern., can be used as a cover crop in agricultural systems to reduce emerging weed populations and build soil organic matter content. It contains glucosinolates, which have attracted some attention for their potential to suppress certain pests and soil-borne diseases, including white mold, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary. We conducted a study to gauge the effect of planting date on B. juncea biomass and glucosinolate production in Kentucky. Weather permitting, B. juncea var. ‘Pacific Gold’ was direct seeded weekly between 24 April and 3 July, 2008 in three replicated 10 m2 plots. Aboveground biomass was collected for measurements of fresh weight, dry weight, and glucosinolate content. Biomass production (y in g m-2) declined with planting date (x, where 24 Apr = 0) according to the equation y = -38.7x + 1916. The final two plantings failed to establish. We conclude that B. juncea var. ‘Pacific Gold’ is best planted in early spring, and is not a suitable summer cover crop for Kentucky.