University of Louisville

Poster Title

Facilitators and Barriers to Self-Management of Type 2 Diabetes Among Urban African American Adults: Focus Group Findings

Institution

University of Louisville

Abstract

Despite medical advances and available health care, African Americans in Kentucky continue to experience preventable life-threatening diabetes-related complications. The purpose of this qualitative pilot study was to identify facilitators and barriers to selfmanagement of type 2 diabetes among African American adults living in an urban community. Seven African American women with type 2 diabetes were recruited from an urban health care agency. Each participant was asked to complete a Demographic Survey and then participated in a focus group session. The focus group session was audiorecorded and field notes were taken by a member of the research team. Data were interpreted and codes and patterns of themes emerging from the data were analyzed. Participants identified peer advising and their understanding of the importance of diet and exercise as facilitators to self-management. Common barriers to self-management identified were lack of trust of professional recommendations, lack of education regarding diabetes management, and loss of self-control of diabetes. Future research efforts should be directed to better understand the lack of trust, lack of education, and loss of self-control issues expressed by the participants. In addition, further research is necessary to explore the common facilitators and barriers to self-management of type 2 diabetes among African Americans.

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Facilitators and Barriers to Self-Management of Type 2 Diabetes Among Urban African American Adults: Focus Group Findings

Despite medical advances and available health care, African Americans in Kentucky continue to experience preventable life-threatening diabetes-related complications. The purpose of this qualitative pilot study was to identify facilitators and barriers to selfmanagement of type 2 diabetes among African American adults living in an urban community. Seven African American women with type 2 diabetes were recruited from an urban health care agency. Each participant was asked to complete a Demographic Survey and then participated in a focus group session. The focus group session was audiorecorded and field notes were taken by a member of the research team. Data were interpreted and codes and patterns of themes emerging from the data were analyzed. Participants identified peer advising and their understanding of the importance of diet and exercise as facilitators to self-management. Common barriers to self-management identified were lack of trust of professional recommendations, lack of education regarding diabetes management, and loss of self-control of diabetes. Future research efforts should be directed to better understand the lack of trust, lack of education, and loss of self-control issues expressed by the participants. In addition, further research is necessary to explore the common facilitators and barriers to self-management of type 2 diabetes among African Americans.