Murray State University

Poster Title

Synthesis and Characterization of Potentially Liquid Crystalline 3,6- Phenanthrenedicarboxamide Derivatives for Use in the Analysis of Metallophilic Interactions

Institution

Murray State University

Abstract

The LCD or liquid crystal display has become a ubiquitous component of any computer system and has prominently replaced the cathode ray tube in the modern television. By researching methods of designing liquid crystalline (LC) molecules and new ways of predicting and controlling their self-assembly, new and improved LC materials may be prepared. A LC mesophase is an intermediate phase between a three-dimensionally ordered crystalline solid and a completely disordered isotropic liquid. LC mesophases flow under pressure. The fluid behavior of the LC mesophase allows the material’s orientation to be manipulated by an external magnetic or electric field. This is how the pixels in an LCD TV are switched on and off. This research focuses on studying a specific kind of interaction in LC phases; the metallophilic interaction. A metallophilic interaction occurs when closed-shell or pseudo-closed-shell metal complexes like Au(I), Pd(II), or Pt(II) stack very close together so that the metal-center electrons are in electronic communication. Having already synthesized metallophilic Pt(II) complexes in the group, we will present the syntheses of completely organic 3,6-phenanthrenedicarboxamide derivatives. These control molecules have the same general size, shape, and rigidity as the Pt(II) complexes, but they cannot form metallophilic interactions. Their analysis therefore presents a vital control for the use of metallophilic interactions for the ordered self-assembly of liquid crystals. The liquid crystalline behavior of these control molecules will be compared to that of the Pt(II) complexes and analysis of the ordering via differential scanning calorimetry and optical microscopy will be presented.

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Synthesis and Characterization of Potentially Liquid Crystalline 3,6- Phenanthrenedicarboxamide Derivatives for Use in the Analysis of Metallophilic Interactions

The LCD or liquid crystal display has become a ubiquitous component of any computer system and has prominently replaced the cathode ray tube in the modern television. By researching methods of designing liquid crystalline (LC) molecules and new ways of predicting and controlling their self-assembly, new and improved LC materials may be prepared. A LC mesophase is an intermediate phase between a three-dimensionally ordered crystalline solid and a completely disordered isotropic liquid. LC mesophases flow under pressure. The fluid behavior of the LC mesophase allows the material’s orientation to be manipulated by an external magnetic or electric field. This is how the pixels in an LCD TV are switched on and off. This research focuses on studying a specific kind of interaction in LC phases; the metallophilic interaction. A metallophilic interaction occurs when closed-shell or pseudo-closed-shell metal complexes like Au(I), Pd(II), or Pt(II) stack very close together so that the metal-center electrons are in electronic communication. Having already synthesized metallophilic Pt(II) complexes in the group, we will present the syntheses of completely organic 3,6-phenanthrenedicarboxamide derivatives. These control molecules have the same general size, shape, and rigidity as the Pt(II) complexes, but they cannot form metallophilic interactions. Their analysis therefore presents a vital control for the use of metallophilic interactions for the ordered self-assembly of liquid crystals. The liquid crystalline behavior of these control molecules will be compared to that of the Pt(II) complexes and analysis of the ordering via differential scanning calorimetry and optical microscopy will be presented.