Murray State University

Poster Title

Incidence of Canine Distemper Virus and Parainfluenza Virus in Western Kentucky Shelter Dogs:Study 2: (Peel) Prevalence of Canine Influenza Virus Subtype H3N8 in Western Kentucky

Institution

Murray State University

Abstract

Canine influenza virus subtype H3N8 is a highly infectious respiratory disease in dogs. This virus is an Influenza A virus and was first discovered as a canine disease in 2004 after an outbreak of respiratory disease in racing greyhounds. While first identified in greyhounds, serologic evidence indicates all dog breeds are susceptible to this disease. Since 2004, the disease has continued to spread across the United States. Cornell University’s Animal Health Diagnostic Center has reported a total of three positive samples of the canine influenza virus in Kentucky. However, since this is an emerging disease, the prevalence in which it occurs throughout canine populations is not well documented in most areas. Furthermore, shelter animals are more likely to be exposed to this virus and may serve as the best indication of the prevalence of this virus in canine populations in a given location. This study, in combination with Kathryn Hogan’s study on Canine Distemper, comprised of a random selection of dogs from two western Kentucky animal shelters in which dogs were tested for canine influenza using nasal swabs. Samples were collected from forty animals from two animal shelters. Additional samples were collected after a time span of two months from the same animal shelters. Samples were sent to Breathitt Veterinary Center in which they were analyzed using a florescent antibody test. The results demonstrate the prevalence of canine influenza in western Kentucky as well as indicate the importance of this disease to veterinary professionals, animal shelters, and public health officials.

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Incidence of Canine Distemper Virus and Parainfluenza Virus in Western Kentucky Shelter Dogs:Study 2: (Peel) Prevalence of Canine Influenza Virus Subtype H3N8 in Western Kentucky

Canine influenza virus subtype H3N8 is a highly infectious respiratory disease in dogs. This virus is an Influenza A virus and was first discovered as a canine disease in 2004 after an outbreak of respiratory disease in racing greyhounds. While first identified in greyhounds, serologic evidence indicates all dog breeds are susceptible to this disease. Since 2004, the disease has continued to spread across the United States. Cornell University’s Animal Health Diagnostic Center has reported a total of three positive samples of the canine influenza virus in Kentucky. However, since this is an emerging disease, the prevalence in which it occurs throughout canine populations is not well documented in most areas. Furthermore, shelter animals are more likely to be exposed to this virus and may serve as the best indication of the prevalence of this virus in canine populations in a given location. This study, in combination with Kathryn Hogan’s study on Canine Distemper, comprised of a random selection of dogs from two western Kentucky animal shelters in which dogs were tested for canine influenza using nasal swabs. Samples were collected from forty animals from two animal shelters. Additional samples were collected after a time span of two months from the same animal shelters. Samples were sent to Breathitt Veterinary Center in which they were analyzed using a florescent antibody test. The results demonstrate the prevalence of canine influenza in western Kentucky as well as indicate the importance of this disease to veterinary professionals, animal shelters, and public health officials.