University of Kentucky

Poster Title

Kentucky: An International Role Model

Institution

University of Kentucky

Abstract

The African country, Liberia, and the American state, Kentucky, have had noteworthy connections throughout history and continue to maintain significant links today. While many are cognizant of Kentucky’s sister city relations throughout the world, few know of the even stronger bond between Kentucky and Liberia. Liberia was first colonized in the 1820’s by former American slaves (Wiley). As a result, there exists an array of cultural aspects within Liberia that mirror our own practices in the United States. Most communities are named after places in America, including the Liberian region Kentucky – complete with a Clay-Ashland town and a Henry Clay High School (Fallah). Residents of Kentucky, Liberia eat collard greens and sweet potato pie at their dinner tables and sing Methodist and Baptist hymns in their churches; these people even have their own version of Stephen Foster’s “My Old Kentucky Home” (KET). Kentucky played a role in both the founding of Liberia and in Liberia’s current status. Today, monetary remittances from emigrated Liberians in America, including Kentucky, are a key driving force in Liberia’s capacity to resist relapse into civil war (Fallah). The purpose of this research was threefold: (1) Kentucky serves as a paradigm for democratic systems in Liberia; (2) Kentucky traditions and customs are worthy of international emulation, as shown in Liberian society; and (3) Liberian refugees currently relocated in Kentucky have an enormous influence in rebuilding Liberia’s war-torn economy. To sum up, this research conveyed Kentucky’s long-standing impact on a global scale through the example of Kentucky in Liberia.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Kentucky: An International Role Model

The African country, Liberia, and the American state, Kentucky, have had noteworthy connections throughout history and continue to maintain significant links today. While many are cognizant of Kentucky’s sister city relations throughout the world, few know of the even stronger bond between Kentucky and Liberia. Liberia was first colonized in the 1820’s by former American slaves (Wiley). As a result, there exists an array of cultural aspects within Liberia that mirror our own practices in the United States. Most communities are named after places in America, including the Liberian region Kentucky – complete with a Clay-Ashland town and a Henry Clay High School (Fallah). Residents of Kentucky, Liberia eat collard greens and sweet potato pie at their dinner tables and sing Methodist and Baptist hymns in their churches; these people even have their own version of Stephen Foster’s “My Old Kentucky Home” (KET). Kentucky played a role in both the founding of Liberia and in Liberia’s current status. Today, monetary remittances from emigrated Liberians in America, including Kentucky, are a key driving force in Liberia’s capacity to resist relapse into civil war (Fallah). The purpose of this research was threefold: (1) Kentucky serves as a paradigm for democratic systems in Liberia; (2) Kentucky traditions and customs are worthy of international emulation, as shown in Liberian society; and (3) Liberian refugees currently relocated in Kentucky have an enormous influence in rebuilding Liberia’s war-torn economy. To sum up, this research conveyed Kentucky’s long-standing impact on a global scale through the example of Kentucky in Liberia.