University of Louisville

Poster Title

The Effects of Culture on Diabetes Self-Management in African American Adults: A Literature Review

Institution

University of Louisville

Abstract

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) imposes a major burden for American Americans. African Americans are disproportionately affected by T2DM and experience higher rates of diabetes-related complications compared to Caucasians. Recent studies have examined the impact of culture on self-management of chronic illnesses such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), congestive heart failure (CHF), and asthma. The purpose of this literature review was to examine the influence of culture on diabetes selfmanagement in African American adults. Electronic databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL) were searched for reports addressing the influence of culture on diabetes self-management in African Americans. The search was limited to studies published in English. A systematic review of the studies was conducted. Key findings included utilizing religion and prayer as a primary coping mechanism, emphasizing the importance of a network of supportive family and friends who understand T2DM, expressing frustration in deviating from traditional African American foods in order to follow dietary recommendations, and demonstrating little to no use of home or herbal remedies for alternative diabetes management. These findings have implications for health care providers who care for African American adults with T2DM. Additionally, these findings suggest that further studies are needed to examine the influence of these variables on diabetes self-management in African Americans with T2DM.

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The Effects of Culture on Diabetes Self-Management in African American Adults: A Literature Review

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) imposes a major burden for American Americans. African Americans are disproportionately affected by T2DM and experience higher rates of diabetes-related complications compared to Caucasians. Recent studies have examined the impact of culture on self-management of chronic illnesses such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), congestive heart failure (CHF), and asthma. The purpose of this literature review was to examine the influence of culture on diabetes selfmanagement in African American adults. Electronic databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL) were searched for reports addressing the influence of culture on diabetes self-management in African Americans. The search was limited to studies published in English. A systematic review of the studies was conducted. Key findings included utilizing religion and prayer as a primary coping mechanism, emphasizing the importance of a network of supportive family and friends who understand T2DM, expressing frustration in deviating from traditional African American foods in order to follow dietary recommendations, and demonstrating little to no use of home or herbal remedies for alternative diabetes management. These findings have implications for health care providers who care for African American adults with T2DM. Additionally, these findings suggest that further studies are needed to examine the influence of these variables on diabetes self-management in African Americans with T2DM.