University of Louisville

Poster Title

The Effects of Motivational Interviewing on Type 2 Diabetes Management in African American Adults: Preliminary Findings

Institution

University of Louisville

Abstract

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a silent killer that affects 17% of African Americans residing in Kentucky compared to 11% of European American residents (USDHHS, 2008). Not only do African Americans have a higher incidence of T2DM, they also have a higher occurrence of diabetes-related complications. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of a motivational interviewing (MI) intervention on adherence to prescribed treatment regimens, diabetes markers, and number of unscheduled health care visits among African Americans with T2DM. Twelve participants, 4 control and 8 intervention, were recruited at the University of Louisville Ambulatory Internal Medicine Clinic. The intervention participants attended 8 motivational interviewing (MI) sessions over 6 months. Anthropometric measurements, diabetes markers, and self-report measures were obtained at baseline and at 3-12 months following baseline. Preliminary findings suggested that the MI sessions may assist African Americans with T2DM in adhering to diabetes regimens thus contributing to lower random glucose levels and decreased abdominal and thigh averages. Due to small sample size, additional analyses are necessary to determine effect of intervention on study outcomes.

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The Effects of Motivational Interviewing on Type 2 Diabetes Management in African American Adults: Preliminary Findings

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a silent killer that affects 17% of African Americans residing in Kentucky compared to 11% of European American residents (USDHHS, 2008). Not only do African Americans have a higher incidence of T2DM, they also have a higher occurrence of diabetes-related complications. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of a motivational interviewing (MI) intervention on adherence to prescribed treatment regimens, diabetes markers, and number of unscheduled health care visits among African Americans with T2DM. Twelve participants, 4 control and 8 intervention, were recruited at the University of Louisville Ambulatory Internal Medicine Clinic. The intervention participants attended 8 motivational interviewing (MI) sessions over 6 months. Anthropometric measurements, diabetes markers, and self-report measures were obtained at baseline and at 3-12 months following baseline. Preliminary findings suggested that the MI sessions may assist African Americans with T2DM in adhering to diabetes regimens thus contributing to lower random glucose levels and decreased abdominal and thigh averages. Due to small sample size, additional analyses are necessary to determine effect of intervention on study outcomes.