Kentucky State University

Poster Title

Does a Methyl Salicylate-Based Lure Attract Lady Beetles to Blackberries?

Institution

Kentucky State University

Abstract

Kentucky produces approximately 45 ha of blackberries for a total value of $1,000,000 annually. Demand for locally grown and damage-free blackberries usually exceeds the supply. Developing more sustainable production methods, including the use of beneficial insect attractants, such as a methyl salicylate-based lure is important for the success of small and limited resource farmers. Eight blackberry sites, including six collaborators, were located in Franklin, Fayette, Scott and Shelby Counties, Kentucky. Three plots were certified organic and the other five plots had no pesticides applied. Four sticky traps and posts were placed in all plots and two PredaLure® lures were placed in each of the PredaLure plots. Sticky traps were collected weekly, placed in labeled ziplock bags and taken to the laboratory where lady beetles were identified using an illuminated magnifier. Total number per species and average number per trap were then calculated. Seven species of lady beetles were identified in the PredaLure plots, while six species were found in the non PredaLure plots. PredaLure plots had more pink lady beetles, while non PredaLure plots had more Asian, spotless, mildew-eating and orange-spotted lady beetles. Results will be discussed with respect to previous laboratory attractancy studies and location of each sampling site, as well as the surrounding landscape.

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Does a Methyl Salicylate-Based Lure Attract Lady Beetles to Blackberries?

Kentucky produces approximately 45 ha of blackberries for a total value of $1,000,000 annually. Demand for locally grown and damage-free blackberries usually exceeds the supply. Developing more sustainable production methods, including the use of beneficial insect attractants, such as a methyl salicylate-based lure is important for the success of small and limited resource farmers. Eight blackberry sites, including six collaborators, were located in Franklin, Fayette, Scott and Shelby Counties, Kentucky. Three plots were certified organic and the other five plots had no pesticides applied. Four sticky traps and posts were placed in all plots and two PredaLure® lures were placed in each of the PredaLure plots. Sticky traps were collected weekly, placed in labeled ziplock bags and taken to the laboratory where lady beetles were identified using an illuminated magnifier. Total number per species and average number per trap were then calculated. Seven species of lady beetles were identified in the PredaLure plots, while six species were found in the non PredaLure plots. PredaLure plots had more pink lady beetles, while non PredaLure plots had more Asian, spotless, mildew-eating and orange-spotted lady beetles. Results will be discussed with respect to previous laboratory attractancy studies and location of each sampling site, as well as the surrounding landscape.