Morehead State University

Poster Title

ET Magazine: “Beauties of the Week” in from 1950s to 1970s

Institution

Morehead State University

Abstract

For generations internalized racism has existed between light-skinned and dark-skinned Black women. Scholars such as Hughes and Hertal (1990), Klonoff and Landrine (2000), and Hill (2011) have explored this form of racism and the role society, family, and especially media have contributed to the process. This preliminary study examines how visual images in JET magazine contributed to internalized racism. JET magazine is a current weekly magazine for readers of African descent and was first issue was published on November 1, 1951. The data set consists of photographs of “Beauties of the Week” from November 1951 to August 1971. Internalized racism was explored by looking at the photographs to determine whether light-skinned or darkskinned Black women were more prevalent. Text accompanying the photos was analyzed to determine if a stigma was attached to being dark-skinned. Ultimately, this study explored if racism can exist within the same racial group impacting magazine cover models, job opportunities, and even a mate.

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ET Magazine: “Beauties of the Week” in from 1950s to 1970s

For generations internalized racism has existed between light-skinned and dark-skinned Black women. Scholars such as Hughes and Hertal (1990), Klonoff and Landrine (2000), and Hill (2011) have explored this form of racism and the role society, family, and especially media have contributed to the process. This preliminary study examines how visual images in JET magazine contributed to internalized racism. JET magazine is a current weekly magazine for readers of African descent and was first issue was published on November 1, 1951. The data set consists of photographs of “Beauties of the Week” from November 1951 to August 1971. Internalized racism was explored by looking at the photographs to determine whether light-skinned or darkskinned Black women were more prevalent. Text accompanying the photos was analyzed to determine if a stigma was attached to being dark-skinned. Ultimately, this study explored if racism can exist within the same racial group impacting magazine cover models, job opportunities, and even a mate.