Northern Kentucky University

Poster Title

Student Learning in Chemistry: Cognitive Skills and Conceptual Models: Study 2 (York): General Education Outcomes in a Science Majors Course

Institution

Northern Kentucky University

Abstract

General Education programs at universities are designed to serve as a foundation for a lifetime of learning. The efficacy of these programs is increasingly under review in order to determine whether students are learning skills needed to advance through the major. The purpose of this research is to determine the extent to which students mastered two of the four learning objectives in the sciences category set out by the General Education requirements. These learning objectives are: 1) application of scientific and quantitative reasoning through problem solving or experimentation and 2) use of evidence-based arguments. A set of questions targeting these two objectives were presented to students on general chemistry course exams. Student responses were then analyzed by developing coding schemes to create a profile of student ability. The results of this research could potentially inform curricular changes to improve General Education courses.

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Student Learning in Chemistry: Cognitive Skills and Conceptual Models: Study 2 (York): General Education Outcomes in a Science Majors Course

General Education programs at universities are designed to serve as a foundation for a lifetime of learning. The efficacy of these programs is increasingly under review in order to determine whether students are learning skills needed to advance through the major. The purpose of this research is to determine the extent to which students mastered two of the four learning objectives in the sciences category set out by the General Education requirements. These learning objectives are: 1) application of scientific and quantitative reasoning through problem solving or experimentation and 2) use of evidence-based arguments. A set of questions targeting these two objectives were presented to students on general chemistry course exams. Student responses were then analyzed by developing coding schemes to create a profile of student ability. The results of this research could potentially inform curricular changes to improve General Education courses.