University of Louisville

Poster Title

Examining Vitamin D in Latino Patients: A Chart Review

Institution

University of Louisville

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to ascertain serum vitamin D levels in Latinos who visited the Kentucky Racing Health Services Center between October 2009 and July 2011 and to determine if the subjects were sufficient (>30.00ng/mL), insufficient (<30.00ng/mL), or deficient (<20.00ng/mL) in serum vitamin D at the time of specimen collection. Data was obtained from 85 medical charts of non-pregnant adult Latino patients between the ages of 18 and 65. Patients with known cancer, liver or kidney disease, and/or hyperparathyroidism were excluded. Data obtained included age, height, weight, gender, self-reported ethnicity, serum calcium level, serum vitamin D level, vitamin D supplementation, and comorbid conditions. Findings indicated 83.5% of the total subject population is insufficient or deficient in serum vitamin D and requires supplementation. Mean serum vitamin D level for the sample is 23.49ng/mL, which is insufficient. Serum vitamin D level 25th percentile is 19.00ng/mL and 75th percentile is 27.00ng/mL. An independent t-test confirmed female subjects had an overall lower mean serum vitamin D level than males regardless of other factors. The impact on practice is that if providers know Latinos are generally low in serum vitamin D, screening can be instituted as part of routine health maintenance and disease prevention. Culturally specific care ensures better outcomes for patients and reduced health care costs in the long term, given the relative ease and affordability of treatment for vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency.

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Examining Vitamin D in Latino Patients: A Chart Review

The purpose of this study was to ascertain serum vitamin D levels in Latinos who visited the Kentucky Racing Health Services Center between October 2009 and July 2011 and to determine if the subjects were sufficient (>30.00ng/mL), insufficient (<30.00ng/mL), or deficient (<20.00ng/mL) in serum vitamin D at the time of specimen collection. Data was obtained from 85 medical charts of non-pregnant adult Latino patients between the ages of 18 and 65. Patients with known cancer, liver or kidney disease, and/or hyperparathyroidism were excluded. Data obtained included age, height, weight, gender, self-reported ethnicity, serum calcium level, serum vitamin D level, vitamin D supplementation, and comorbid conditions. Findings indicated 83.5% of the total subject population is insufficient or deficient in serum vitamin D and requires supplementation. Mean serum vitamin D level for the sample is 23.49ng/mL, which is insufficient. Serum vitamin D level 25th percentile is 19.00ng/mL and 75th percentile is 27.00ng/mL. An independent t-test confirmed female subjects had an overall lower mean serum vitamin D level than males regardless of other factors. The impact on practice is that if providers know Latinos are generally low in serum vitamin D, screening can be instituted as part of routine health maintenance and disease prevention. Culturally specific care ensures better outcomes for patients and reduced health care costs in the long term, given the relative ease and affordability of treatment for vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency.