Eastern Kentucky University

Poster Title

Hearing Voices: Negative Implications of Using the DSM in Diagnosing Deaf Individuals with Schizophrenia

Institution

Eastern Kentucky University

Abstract

The current edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV-TR (DSM) rarely serves Deaf Americans sufficiently. Specifically, Deaf individuals with schizophrenia face extreme disparities in diagnoses compared to hearing individuals when the DSM is used. The diagnostic criteria for schizophrenia conflicts with inherent aspects of Deaf culture, especially related to American Sign Language (ASL) and similar gestural languages. Because the DSM was written for a target culture (in this case, the average white hearing American population) it excludes members of the Deaf culture and other marginalized groups. Focusing on common symptoms of schizophrenia, the current research analyzes how Deaf culture clashes, namely in the use of language and speech dysfluency, hallucinations and delusions, and movement disorders. Resolving this disparity can positively affect Kentucky's (and other states') current financial crisis in the area of mental health and Deaf consumers.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Hearing Voices: Negative Implications of Using the DSM in Diagnosing Deaf Individuals with Schizophrenia

The current edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV-TR (DSM) rarely serves Deaf Americans sufficiently. Specifically, Deaf individuals with schizophrenia face extreme disparities in diagnoses compared to hearing individuals when the DSM is used. The diagnostic criteria for schizophrenia conflicts with inherent aspects of Deaf culture, especially related to American Sign Language (ASL) and similar gestural languages. Because the DSM was written for a target culture (in this case, the average white hearing American population) it excludes members of the Deaf culture and other marginalized groups. Focusing on common symptoms of schizophrenia, the current research analyzes how Deaf culture clashes, namely in the use of language and speech dysfluency, hallucinations and delusions, and movement disorders. Resolving this disparity can positively affect Kentucky's (and other states') current financial crisis in the area of mental health and Deaf consumers.