Eastern Kentucky University

Poster Title

Triclosan Resistance Patterns in Bacteria from Aquatic and Terrestrial Environments in Madison County, Kentucky

Institution

Eastern Kentucky University

Abstract

Triclosan is an antibacterial agent found in a wide assortment of consumer products, from soap and personal hygiene products to socks and bedding. There has been much debate over the possible consequences of such widespread use of this compound. At low concentrations it behaves like an antibiotic, selectively targeting a carrier protein, reductase (FabI), an essential enzyme in the synthesis of bacterial fatty acids. The aim of this study was to determine resistance patterns in bacteria obtained from a variety of aquatic and terrestrial environments. It was hypothesized that bacteria from pristine ecological areas would be less resistant to triclosan than bacteria from areas with a high probability of contamination. Bacteria from the Kentucky River and other local water bodies were inoculated on media with various levels of triclosan. This was also done on bacteria isolated from soil samples. Bacteria showing evidence of resistance were tested against antibiotics. Initial results suggest that soil bacteria have low levels of resistance to triclosan.

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Triclosan Resistance Patterns in Bacteria from Aquatic and Terrestrial Environments in Madison County, Kentucky

Triclosan is an antibacterial agent found in a wide assortment of consumer products, from soap and personal hygiene products to socks and bedding. There has been much debate over the possible consequences of such widespread use of this compound. At low concentrations it behaves like an antibiotic, selectively targeting a carrier protein, reductase (FabI), an essential enzyme in the synthesis of bacterial fatty acids. The aim of this study was to determine resistance patterns in bacteria obtained from a variety of aquatic and terrestrial environments. It was hypothesized that bacteria from pristine ecological areas would be less resistant to triclosan than bacteria from areas with a high probability of contamination. Bacteria from the Kentucky River and other local water bodies were inoculated on media with various levels of triclosan. This was also done on bacteria isolated from soil samples. Bacteria showing evidence of resistance were tested against antibiotics. Initial results suggest that soil bacteria have low levels of resistance to triclosan.