Morehead State University

Poster Title

Globalization and Human Rights in China

Institution

Morehead State University

Abstract

Since China opened up to FDI and trade, its economy has demonstrated remarkable growth. Along with increased economic prowess, China has taken a larger role in international law, and has been involved in the international dialogue on human rights since the early 1980’s. In 1982, the new Constitution for the Peoples’ Republic of China identified numerous political, civil, economic, and social rights. In addition, since 1980 China has joined several human rights treaties by the United Nations General Assembly and all four of the Geneva humanitarian conventions. Despite this, China still falls under criticism for its poor human rights record. Our research analyzes whether the effect of China’s economic integration into the global market has a positive or negative effect on China’s human rights record. To do this, we conduct a within case study of China before and after 1980. Using levels of FDI, portfolio investment, and foreign trade within each studied area, economic integration is measured. Our research demonstrates that despite China’s increased global economic integration and economic rights, civil, political, and social rights enjoyed by Chinese citizens have declined while respect for physical integrity rights have fluctuated.

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Globalization and Human Rights in China

Since China opened up to FDI and trade, its economy has demonstrated remarkable growth. Along with increased economic prowess, China has taken a larger role in international law, and has been involved in the international dialogue on human rights since the early 1980’s. In 1982, the new Constitution for the Peoples’ Republic of China identified numerous political, civil, economic, and social rights. In addition, since 1980 China has joined several human rights treaties by the United Nations General Assembly and all four of the Geneva humanitarian conventions. Despite this, China still falls under criticism for its poor human rights record. Our research analyzes whether the effect of China’s economic integration into the global market has a positive or negative effect on China’s human rights record. To do this, we conduct a within case study of China before and after 1980. Using levels of FDI, portfolio investment, and foreign trade within each studied area, economic integration is measured. Our research demonstrates that despite China’s increased global economic integration and economic rights, civil, political, and social rights enjoyed by Chinese citizens have declined while respect for physical integrity rights have fluctuated.