University of Louisville

Poster Title

Nanotoxicology: In Situ Size Distribution of Nanoceria in Rat Kupffer Cells

Presenter Information

Khoua Lor, University of Louisville

Institution

University of Louisville

Abstract

Ceria nanocrystals are found in commercial applications such as diesel fuel additives, catalysts for self-cleaning ovens, dental hygiene products, polishing agents for glass mirrors and ophthalmic lenses. The toxicological effects of nanoparticles on human health remain unknown, but testing revealed potential pharmacological applications of cerium oxide as a powerful antioxidant that can be utilized in the treatment of neurodegenerative disease, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and radiation-induced tissue damage. Before the implementation or incorporation of ceria based pharmaceutical products, its effects on the body must be understood; therefore it is necessary to study the accumulation and toxicity. Previous studies of the bioaccumulation of 30 nm nanoceria in the phagolysosome were persistent in rat Kupffer cells at 90 days post-exposure. The biopersistence of nanoceria in the phagolysosome led to the formation of granuloma cells. Based on these findings, the biopersistence of naonoceria gains our interest to determine its fate over the period of 90 days. Cerium oxide nanoparticles endocytosed by Kupffer cells revealed ceria agglomerates enclosed within lysosomal and phagolysosomal cells at 1 hour post-exposure, 20 hours, 30 days, and 90 days of a single injection. Our analysis of particle size distribution reflects the persistence of naonceria in kupffer cells over an extended period of time.

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Nanotoxicology: In Situ Size Distribution of Nanoceria in Rat Kupffer Cells

Ceria nanocrystals are found in commercial applications such as diesel fuel additives, catalysts for self-cleaning ovens, dental hygiene products, polishing agents for glass mirrors and ophthalmic lenses. The toxicological effects of nanoparticles on human health remain unknown, but testing revealed potential pharmacological applications of cerium oxide as a powerful antioxidant that can be utilized in the treatment of neurodegenerative disease, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and radiation-induced tissue damage. Before the implementation or incorporation of ceria based pharmaceutical products, its effects on the body must be understood; therefore it is necessary to study the accumulation and toxicity. Previous studies of the bioaccumulation of 30 nm nanoceria in the phagolysosome were persistent in rat Kupffer cells at 90 days post-exposure. The biopersistence of nanoceria in the phagolysosome led to the formation of granuloma cells. Based on these findings, the biopersistence of naonoceria gains our interest to determine its fate over the period of 90 days. Cerium oxide nanoparticles endocytosed by Kupffer cells revealed ceria agglomerates enclosed within lysosomal and phagolysosomal cells at 1 hour post-exposure, 20 hours, 30 days, and 90 days of a single injection. Our analysis of particle size distribution reflects the persistence of naonceria in kupffer cells over an extended period of time.