Western Kentucky University

Poster Title

Antimicrobial and Antiangiogenic Drugs - Relevance in Biomedical Research: Study 2 (Gonzales, Pender, Paripelly, & Donald)

Institution

Western Kentucky University

Abstract

Fibroblast Growth Factors are a family of proteins that are involved in angiogenesis, wound healing, and cell development. FGFs rely upon binding with heparin for signal transduction throughout the cell. Inositol is a monosaccharide and it is component of membrane phospholipids. Inositol also able to bind with phosphate groups to create complexes that have numerous roles in cellular function. In this context, we expressed, purified FGF1 and investigated its interaction with myo-inositol using various biophysical techniques including fluorescence thermal denaturation, pulse proteolysis and multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. Results show that the myo-inositol binds with FGF1 and enhances its thermal stability as well as its solvent accessibility. Currently multidimensional NMR studies are underway to investigate the binding site(s). This information will aid in the design of better pharmacological targets.

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Antimicrobial and Antiangiogenic Drugs - Relevance in Biomedical Research: Study 2 (Gonzales, Pender, Paripelly, & Donald)

Fibroblast Growth Factors are a family of proteins that are involved in angiogenesis, wound healing, and cell development. FGFs rely upon binding with heparin for signal transduction throughout the cell. Inositol is a monosaccharide and it is component of membrane phospholipids. Inositol also able to bind with phosphate groups to create complexes that have numerous roles in cellular function. In this context, we expressed, purified FGF1 and investigated its interaction with myo-inositol using various biophysical techniques including fluorescence thermal denaturation, pulse proteolysis and multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. Results show that the myo-inositol binds with FGF1 and enhances its thermal stability as well as its solvent accessibility. Currently multidimensional NMR studies are underway to investigate the binding site(s). This information will aid in the design of better pharmacological targets.