Western Kentucky University

Poster Title

Understanding the Haptic Response of Wood Finishes

Institution

Western Kentucky University

Abstract

In the modern age of touch-screen technology, there has been an increased interest in the friction characteristics of skin. Using a custom-built friction device, the frictional properties of skin on different wood species and wood finishes were tested. The wood samples included Eastern White Pine, North American Cherry, and Birdseye Maple. The finishes included shellac, lacquer, and polyurethane. The friction coefficients ranged from kinetic values of 0.22 to 5.42 and static values of 0.46 to 4.80. Raw wood had the lowest friction coefficients, but it is more common to apply a finish in most applications. The results showed that the satin finishes had lower friction than the gloss finishes on each type of wood. On average, a satin finish has 300% less friction than a gloss finish. The increased and very high friction from skin on gloss finish suggests an adhesion mechanism is a strong factor in the friction system. The data also suggests that moisture in a hydrated finger increases friction in both satin and gloss finishes. This research is the first to quantitatively define the tactile feel of wood surfaces.

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Understanding the Haptic Response of Wood Finishes

In the modern age of touch-screen technology, there has been an increased interest in the friction characteristics of skin. Using a custom-built friction device, the frictional properties of skin on different wood species and wood finishes were tested. The wood samples included Eastern White Pine, North American Cherry, and Birdseye Maple. The finishes included shellac, lacquer, and polyurethane. The friction coefficients ranged from kinetic values of 0.22 to 5.42 and static values of 0.46 to 4.80. Raw wood had the lowest friction coefficients, but it is more common to apply a finish in most applications. The results showed that the satin finishes had lower friction than the gloss finishes on each type of wood. On average, a satin finish has 300% less friction than a gloss finish. The increased and very high friction from skin on gloss finish suggests an adhesion mechanism is a strong factor in the friction system. The data also suggests that moisture in a hydrated finger increases friction in both satin and gloss finishes. This research is the first to quantitatively define the tactile feel of wood surfaces.