Kentucky State University

Poster Title

Urinary Levels of Oxidative Stress Marker (8-OHdG) in Young African American Population with Metabolic Syndrome (MetS): A College Study

Institution

Kentucky State University

Abstract

There are ethnic disparities in the prevalence of obesity in the US population. African Americans (AA) continue to report higher rates for obesity than any other ethnic group. Overweight and obesity are linked to greater risk for Metabolic Syndrome (MetS), a frank indicator of risk of future chronic and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). One of the possible mechanisms for increasing the risk for CVD might be the excessive generation of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) produced either endogenously or exogenously that could attack lipid, protein and nucleic acid in the living cells. 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), an oxidized nucleoside of DNA, is the most frequently detected and widely studied DNA lesion and its urinary level is used as a good biomarker of generalized, cellular oxidative stress. There are limited data on prevalence of MetS and levels of 8-OHdG in young AA adults (18-24years). In the current study on evaluation of prevalence of MetS in college freshmen, fasting urine samples were collected from consenting healthy (n=113) and students detected with MetS (n=29), in the last two years. The average age of the participants was 19.5 years. Using ELISA technique, the urine samples were analyzed for assessing the levels of 8-OHdG. Correlations with individual factors for MetS and urinary levels of 8-OHdG were ascertained. The findings of the study would offer greater insight in designing effective nutritional and life style related strategies in better management of MetS, especially in young AA adults.

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Urinary Levels of Oxidative Stress Marker (8-OHdG) in Young African American Population with Metabolic Syndrome (MetS): A College Study

There are ethnic disparities in the prevalence of obesity in the US population. African Americans (AA) continue to report higher rates for obesity than any other ethnic group. Overweight and obesity are linked to greater risk for Metabolic Syndrome (MetS), a frank indicator of risk of future chronic and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). One of the possible mechanisms for increasing the risk for CVD might be the excessive generation of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) produced either endogenously or exogenously that could attack lipid, protein and nucleic acid in the living cells. 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), an oxidized nucleoside of DNA, is the most frequently detected and widely studied DNA lesion and its urinary level is used as a good biomarker of generalized, cellular oxidative stress. There are limited data on prevalence of MetS and levels of 8-OHdG in young AA adults (18-24years). In the current study on evaluation of prevalence of MetS in college freshmen, fasting urine samples were collected from consenting healthy (n=113) and students detected with MetS (n=29), in the last two years. The average age of the participants was 19.5 years. Using ELISA technique, the urine samples were analyzed for assessing the levels of 8-OHdG. Correlations with individual factors for MetS and urinary levels of 8-OHdG were ascertained. The findings of the study would offer greater insight in designing effective nutritional and life style related strategies in better management of MetS, especially in young AA adults.