University of Louisville

Poster Title

Interventions Used in the Treatment of Comorbid Diabetes and Depression: A Review of the Literature

Institution

University of Louisville

Abstract

Type 2 diabetes mellitus affects many Americans and causes a myriad of both physical and psychological complications. Comorbid diabetes and depression has become a major issue of concern among health care providers. Individuals with comorbid diabetes and depression have greater difficulty with diabetes self-management than non-depressed people with diabetes. It is essential that health care providers implement appropriate interventions to assist clients with diabetes self-management and the prevention of diabetes-related complications. The purpose of the literature review was to examine interventions used in the treatment of comorbid diabetes and depression. A literature search was performed using electronic databases (CINAHL and PubMed). Different keywords used throughout the search process included: type 2 diabetes mellitus, depression, and interventions. Twenty-four published articles were selected for this review. Researchers recognize a link between diabetes and depression; few studies have examined interventions to address depression in the adult population. Certain focused interventions such as self-efficacy training, regular telephone interventions, cognitive behavioral therapy, and nurse-led psychological interventions were found to be effective in improving diabetes-self management practices. Limited studies have examined the effect of interventions on diabetes self-management behaviors and diabetes-related complications. This knowledge may be most helpful for health care providers caring for adults with diabetes. Additional studies are necessary to examine the interventions that address the process, outcome, and treatment modalities for adults with diabetes.

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Interventions Used in the Treatment of Comorbid Diabetes and Depression: A Review of the Literature

Type 2 diabetes mellitus affects many Americans and causes a myriad of both physical and psychological complications. Comorbid diabetes and depression has become a major issue of concern among health care providers. Individuals with comorbid diabetes and depression have greater difficulty with diabetes self-management than non-depressed people with diabetes. It is essential that health care providers implement appropriate interventions to assist clients with diabetes self-management and the prevention of diabetes-related complications. The purpose of the literature review was to examine interventions used in the treatment of comorbid diabetes and depression. A literature search was performed using electronic databases (CINAHL and PubMed). Different keywords used throughout the search process included: type 2 diabetes mellitus, depression, and interventions. Twenty-four published articles were selected for this review. Researchers recognize a link between diabetes and depression; few studies have examined interventions to address depression in the adult population. Certain focused interventions such as self-efficacy training, regular telephone interventions, cognitive behavioral therapy, and nurse-led psychological interventions were found to be effective in improving diabetes-self management practices. Limited studies have examined the effect of interventions on diabetes self-management behaviors and diabetes-related complications. This knowledge may be most helpful for health care providers caring for adults with diabetes. Additional studies are necessary to examine the interventions that address the process, outcome, and treatment modalities for adults with diabetes.