University of Louisville

Poster Title

Effects of Depression, Anxiety, and Stress on Diabetes Biomarkers in African American Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

Institution

University of Louisville

Abstract

African Americans are disproportionately affected by diabetes and experience more diabetesrelated complications than non-Hispanic whites. Individuals with comorbid diabetes and depression have poorer glycemic control and more difficulty with self-management than nondepressed people with diabetes. The purpose of this ongoing interdisciplinary study is to examine the effects of depression, anxiety, and stress on diabetes biomarkers in African American adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A convenience sample of 75 African American adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus will be recruited from an ambulatory internal medicine clinic at an academic medical center. To date, a convenience sample of 8 participants was recruited. Participants completed the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale-21. Diabetes markers (glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA1c] and body mass index [BMI]) were obtained from medical records. Spearman’s rho was used to examine the relationships of depression, anxiety, and stress with diabetes biomarkers. Based on preliminary data, 50% of participants had moderate to high levels of depression and 75% reported moderate to high levels of stress and anxiety. All participants were overweight or obese (mean BMI of 43.6) with a mean HbA1c of 9.1. Higher BMIs were associated with higher anxiety levels. Results of the completed study (N=75) will be reported at the Posters-at-the-Capitol Event in 2014. Depression, stress, and anxiety should be further addressed in planning care for this population, as supported by preliminary findings. The knowledge obtained from the completed study will assist in designing interventions to improve diabetes outcomes and self-management in this vulnerable population.

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Effects of Depression, Anxiety, and Stress on Diabetes Biomarkers in African American Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

African Americans are disproportionately affected by diabetes and experience more diabetesrelated complications than non-Hispanic whites. Individuals with comorbid diabetes and depression have poorer glycemic control and more difficulty with self-management than nondepressed people with diabetes. The purpose of this ongoing interdisciplinary study is to examine the effects of depression, anxiety, and stress on diabetes biomarkers in African American adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A convenience sample of 75 African American adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus will be recruited from an ambulatory internal medicine clinic at an academic medical center. To date, a convenience sample of 8 participants was recruited. Participants completed the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale-21. Diabetes markers (glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA1c] and body mass index [BMI]) were obtained from medical records. Spearman’s rho was used to examine the relationships of depression, anxiety, and stress with diabetes biomarkers. Based on preliminary data, 50% of participants had moderate to high levels of depression and 75% reported moderate to high levels of stress and anxiety. All participants were overweight or obese (mean BMI of 43.6) with a mean HbA1c of 9.1. Higher BMIs were associated with higher anxiety levels. Results of the completed study (N=75) will be reported at the Posters-at-the-Capitol Event in 2014. Depression, stress, and anxiety should be further addressed in planning care for this population, as supported by preliminary findings. The knowledge obtained from the completed study will assist in designing interventions to improve diabetes outcomes and self-management in this vulnerable population.