Western Kentucky University

Poster Title

A Multi-wavelength Analysis of Cold Evolving Interstellar Clouds

Institution

Western Kentucky University

Abstract

Since galaxies are essential parts of the universe’s structure, their internal workings, like star formation and the interstellar medium (ISM), are important to understand. The ISM is mostly made up of atomic and molecular gas. At some critical point in the clouds’ development, the atomic gas will cool and form molecular gas, which can then lead to gravitational collapse and new star formation. Certain properties like density and temperature are important to understanding this process, but are hard to determine without making various assumptions. To test the effects of these assumptions, we ran property analyses using different input parameters and computations involving interstellar dust and carbon monoxide (CO) data. From the data, we could see how different components of the ISM matched up and affected numerical values. A statistical overview of our results, including variations of cloud properties in different regions of the Galaxy to look for environmental influences on star formation will be presented.

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A Multi-wavelength Analysis of Cold Evolving Interstellar Clouds

Since galaxies are essential parts of the universe’s structure, their internal workings, like star formation and the interstellar medium (ISM), are important to understand. The ISM is mostly made up of atomic and molecular gas. At some critical point in the clouds’ development, the atomic gas will cool and form molecular gas, which can then lead to gravitational collapse and new star formation. Certain properties like density and temperature are important to understanding this process, but are hard to determine without making various assumptions. To test the effects of these assumptions, we ran property analyses using different input parameters and computations involving interstellar dust and carbon monoxide (CO) data. From the data, we could see how different components of the ISM matched up and affected numerical values. A statistical overview of our results, including variations of cloud properties in different regions of the Galaxy to look for environmental influences on star formation will be presented.