Kentucky State University

Poster Title

Location and Percent Canopy Cover of Ash Trees Infected by the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) on the Campus of Kentucky State University

Institution

Kentucky State University

Abstract

The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) has led to the mortality of many Ash trees (Fraxinus americanus) in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. The EAB has the potential to cause a devastating effect on the lumber industry and wildlife that use the tree as their habitat. The EAB larvae harm the Ash tree by consuming the cambium of the tree, which reduces the nutrient flow in the tree and leads to a reduction of the foliage within a few years after infestation. For this study, the percent canopy cover of the affected Ash trees was evaluated with a crown densiometer on the campus of Kentucky State University in Frankfort, KY from late summer to abscission and leaf fall. Ash trees within walking distance of paved surfaces (e.g. parking lots and sidewalks) were assessed for this study. The GPS coordinates were collected with a Garmin eTREX GPS receiver and a map was created. There were approximately 65 trees assessed for this study. The mean percent canopy cover of the sampled trees was 19.5% while the median percent canopy cover of the sampled trees was 7.28%. Fifty-five percent of the sampled trees had less than 10% cover, which could have included dead branches and vines. Based on the results of this study, we suggest the removal of the trees that could cause potential damage to property and replant with native species not parasitized by the EAB.

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Location and Percent Canopy Cover of Ash Trees Infected by the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) on the Campus of Kentucky State University

The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) has led to the mortality of many Ash trees (Fraxinus americanus) in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. The EAB has the potential to cause a devastating effect on the lumber industry and wildlife that use the tree as their habitat. The EAB larvae harm the Ash tree by consuming the cambium of the tree, which reduces the nutrient flow in the tree and leads to a reduction of the foliage within a few years after infestation. For this study, the percent canopy cover of the affected Ash trees was evaluated with a crown densiometer on the campus of Kentucky State University in Frankfort, KY from late summer to abscission and leaf fall. Ash trees within walking distance of paved surfaces (e.g. parking lots and sidewalks) were assessed for this study. The GPS coordinates were collected with a Garmin eTREX GPS receiver and a map was created. There were approximately 65 trees assessed for this study. The mean percent canopy cover of the sampled trees was 19.5% while the median percent canopy cover of the sampled trees was 7.28%. Fifty-five percent of the sampled trees had less than 10% cover, which could have included dead branches and vines. Based on the results of this study, we suggest the removal of the trees that could cause potential damage to property and replant with native species not parasitized by the EAB.