Kentucky State University

Poster Title

Optimizing a Trapping System to Monitor Spotted Wing Drosophila in Organic Primocane Fruiting Blackberries

Institution

Kentucky State University

Abstract

Spotted wing drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii, is a new pest to small fruit and tree fruit crops in Kentucky. This fruit fly is native to Asia and can be very destructive to soft-skinned fruits including blueberries, blackberries and raspberries. Later-ripening small fruit crops such as primocane fruiting blackberries are at the highest risk. This pest is a serious challenge for organic growers. Unlike other fruit flies, SWD lay eggs inside fresh fruit, often before harvest. Aside from superficial scars left by the female’s ovipositor, most damage is done by maggots feeding inside the fruit. The objective of this study was to determine the attractiveness of three different lure baits for monitoring SWD presence and numbers. Traps were placed in an existing primocane fruiting blackberry variety trial consisting of the cultivars Prime Jan® and PrimeArk® 45 at the Kentucky State University Research and Demonstration Farm in Frankfort, KY. Traps made from red drink cups were baited with a 150 ml per cup solution of either yeast, sugar and water (control), 1 part pawpaw extract: 4 parts yeast, sugar and water, or 1 part blackberry extract: 4 parts yeast, sugar and water, with four replicates of each bait. Traps were collected after three days, brought back to the lab and transferred to containers with 70% ETOH. SWD males, females, and other Drosophila sp. were identified and enumerated. Numbers of SWD and other Drosophila sp. captured by the different trap baits were compared.

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Optimizing a Trapping System to Monitor Spotted Wing Drosophila in Organic Primocane Fruiting Blackberries

Spotted wing drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii, is a new pest to small fruit and tree fruit crops in Kentucky. This fruit fly is native to Asia and can be very destructive to soft-skinned fruits including blueberries, blackberries and raspberries. Later-ripening small fruit crops such as primocane fruiting blackberries are at the highest risk. This pest is a serious challenge for organic growers. Unlike other fruit flies, SWD lay eggs inside fresh fruit, often before harvest. Aside from superficial scars left by the female’s ovipositor, most damage is done by maggots feeding inside the fruit. The objective of this study was to determine the attractiveness of three different lure baits for monitoring SWD presence and numbers. Traps were placed in an existing primocane fruiting blackberry variety trial consisting of the cultivars Prime Jan® and PrimeArk® 45 at the Kentucky State University Research and Demonstration Farm in Frankfort, KY. Traps made from red drink cups were baited with a 150 ml per cup solution of either yeast, sugar and water (control), 1 part pawpaw extract: 4 parts yeast, sugar and water, or 1 part blackberry extract: 4 parts yeast, sugar and water, with four replicates of each bait. Traps were collected after three days, brought back to the lab and transferred to containers with 70% ETOH. SWD males, females, and other Drosophila sp. were identified and enumerated. Numbers of SWD and other Drosophila sp. captured by the different trap baits were compared.