Kentucky State University

Poster Title

Variation in Pungency among Hot Pepper Genotypes

Institution

Kentucky State University

Abstract

The use of soil amendments in agricultural production is an affordable way for limited-resource farmers. Five accessions of hot pepper (PI 435916 and PI 438614 from Capsicum chinense, PI 370004 and Grif 9354 from C. baccatum and PI 438649 from C. annuum) were selected from the USDA Capsicum germplasm collection to assess fruit concentrations of two capsaicinoids (capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin) and the impact of soil mixed with recycled waste (yard waste YW, sewage sludge SS, and chicken manure CM) on concentrations of capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin in mature fruits. Great variability in pungency among the accessions tested were found. Pungency in hot pepper is identified by a sharp taste or sensation of heat caused by the fruit when consumed, and this sensation is a result of fruit capsaicinoids content. The PI 438614 and PI 435916 of C. chinense contained the greatest concentrations of total capsaicinoids compared to other accessions tested. There was a direct correlation between total capsaicinoids level and pungency. The use of SS as a soil amendment in land farming provided a constructive means of waste disposal, and a viable method for improving soil fertility. Fruits of plants grown in SS and CM contained the greatest fruit weight. The total marketable yield, expressed as weight of fruits, was significantly higher in soils mixed with SS and CM compared to those mixed with YW and no-mulch bare soil.

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Variation in Pungency among Hot Pepper Genotypes

The use of soil amendments in agricultural production is an affordable way for limited-resource farmers. Five accessions of hot pepper (PI 435916 and PI 438614 from Capsicum chinense, PI 370004 and Grif 9354 from C. baccatum and PI 438649 from C. annuum) were selected from the USDA Capsicum germplasm collection to assess fruit concentrations of two capsaicinoids (capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin) and the impact of soil mixed with recycled waste (yard waste YW, sewage sludge SS, and chicken manure CM) on concentrations of capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin in mature fruits. Great variability in pungency among the accessions tested were found. Pungency in hot pepper is identified by a sharp taste or sensation of heat caused by the fruit when consumed, and this sensation is a result of fruit capsaicinoids content. The PI 438614 and PI 435916 of C. chinense contained the greatest concentrations of total capsaicinoids compared to other accessions tested. There was a direct correlation between total capsaicinoids level and pungency. The use of SS as a soil amendment in land farming provided a constructive means of waste disposal, and a viable method for improving soil fertility. Fruits of plants grown in SS and CM contained the greatest fruit weight. The total marketable yield, expressed as weight of fruits, was significantly higher in soils mixed with SS and CM compared to those mixed with YW and no-mulch bare soil.