Murray State University

Poster Title

The Impact of Quality of Sleep on Academic Performance in University Students

Institution

Murray State University

Abstract

Current literature suggested that the most effective method for improving quality of sleep for students includes regulating a consistent sleep schedule throughout the week. But the relationship between quality of sleep and the academic performance of university students is not sufficiently addressed in literature. The aim of this research study was to assess the relationship between various aspects involving overall quality of sleep and academic performance of university students. The data were collected between 10 February and 10 March 2015 at a midsize, rural, public university in the South. The study included a systematic random sample of students from all student classification levels (undergraduate freshman, sophomore, junior, senior; and graduate) currently enrolled in university courses. Participants (n=158) answered a self-administered questionnaire which assessed demographics; a sleep quality profile including sleep duration, contributing factors to sleep deprivation, daytime sleepiness, and the use of sleep remedies; and an academic profile including number of enrolled courses, and current cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA). Quality of sleep and GPA were analyzed using a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and χ² test for independence. This study found that most university students (n=93, 60.4%) feel they do not get a sufficient amount of sleep. As a result, most of the students suffer from daytime sleepiness, which interferes with their ability to concentrate, and results in impaired ability to learn or retain information as demonstrated by their GPA.

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The Impact of Quality of Sleep on Academic Performance in University Students

Current literature suggested that the most effective method for improving quality of sleep for students includes regulating a consistent sleep schedule throughout the week. But the relationship between quality of sleep and the academic performance of university students is not sufficiently addressed in literature. The aim of this research study was to assess the relationship between various aspects involving overall quality of sleep and academic performance of university students. The data were collected between 10 February and 10 March 2015 at a midsize, rural, public university in the South. The study included a systematic random sample of students from all student classification levels (undergraduate freshman, sophomore, junior, senior; and graduate) currently enrolled in university courses. Participants (n=158) answered a self-administered questionnaire which assessed demographics; a sleep quality profile including sleep duration, contributing factors to sleep deprivation, daytime sleepiness, and the use of sleep remedies; and an academic profile including number of enrolled courses, and current cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA). Quality of sleep and GPA were analyzed using a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and χ² test for independence. This study found that most university students (n=93, 60.4%) feel they do not get a sufficient amount of sleep. As a result, most of the students suffer from daytime sleepiness, which interferes with their ability to concentrate, and results in impaired ability to learn or retain information as demonstrated by their GPA.