Poster Title

Personality Traits that Influence Truthfulness and Deception

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Junior

Institution

Eastern Kentucky University

KY House District #

76

KY Senate District #

28

Department

Psychology

Abstract

Everyday deception reflects lying and misrepresenting the truth as part of our daily lives. While everyday deception is by definition commonplace and often reflects a normal and even healthy state of mind, the frequency and intent behind such deception could also reflect mental illness. One major component of individual differences in everyday deception is personality. Identifying personality traits that coincide with everyday deception is crucial to understanding how individual differences relate to both social and antisocial tendencies. The current study tested the hypothesis that the sensation seeking personality trait and psychopathy can predict everyday deception. Seventy-nine undergraduate students participated in an online study to assess these personality traits. Participants completed the Zuckerman’s Sensation Seeking scale form V, impulsive sensation seeking, the Triarchic Psychopathy scale, and 60 questions that assessed the frequency and depth of everyday deception. A simultaneous linear regression analysis found that disinhibition psychopathy was a strong positive predictor of everyday deception. Also, the experience seeking subtrait of sensation seeking was a significant negative predictor of everyday deception. These findings show that personality does influence deception, and that everyday deception can characterize both normal and disordered behavior.

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Personality Traits that Influence Truthfulness and Deception

Everyday deception reflects lying and misrepresenting the truth as part of our daily lives. While everyday deception is by definition commonplace and often reflects a normal and even healthy state of mind, the frequency and intent behind such deception could also reflect mental illness. One major component of individual differences in everyday deception is personality. Identifying personality traits that coincide with everyday deception is crucial to understanding how individual differences relate to both social and antisocial tendencies. The current study tested the hypothesis that the sensation seeking personality trait and psychopathy can predict everyday deception. Seventy-nine undergraduate students participated in an online study to assess these personality traits. Participants completed the Zuckerman’s Sensation Seeking scale form V, impulsive sensation seeking, the Triarchic Psychopathy scale, and 60 questions that assessed the frequency and depth of everyday deception. A simultaneous linear regression analysis found that disinhibition psychopathy was a strong positive predictor of everyday deception. Also, the experience seeking subtrait of sensation seeking was a significant negative predictor of everyday deception. These findings show that personality does influence deception, and that everyday deception can characterize both normal and disordered behavior.