Poster Title

Perceptions of Gynecological Visits; Contributing factors to Fear and Anxiety

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Junior

Institution

Eastern Kentucky University

KY House District #

91

KY Senate District #

91

Department

Nursing/Public Health

Abstract

Women’s health is a complex and important field of study. Routine gynecological screenings play a vital role in maintenance of overall good health but are often underutilized. Engaging in the gynecological medical encounter provides women with an understanding of general health, allows for the detection of various infections, like the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), and equips women with knowledge and tools to prevent disease. Of particular importance is the early detection of cervical cancer caused by HPV. The current study examined factors that encourage and/or discourage gynecological care seeking behavior. Specifically this study examined correlations between how fear, embarrassment, cost, history of sexual abuse, transportation challenges, social stigmas, and access to care are associated with gynecological care seeking behavior. Additionally, this study looked at difference between care seeking behavior and race. Participants were recruited via social media and ranged in age from 18 to 26. A total of (n=82) participants completed an online quantitative link style survey. Results revealed that majority of the participants identified themselves as Black or African-American, with 56% and 39% of the participants identified themselves as White or Caucasian. When the participants were asked if they currently have health insurance 98% answered yes and 3% answered no; examining this factor gave insight to a possible limitation to gynecological visits. Participants were asked how often they make an appoint to their gynecologist 29% answered never, and 44% of the respondents answered once a year acknowledging their commitment to a routine physical with their gynecologist. This research study was developed to see if certain factors such as; fear, embarrassment, sexual abuse, cost, transportation, and certain ethnicities negatively influence the attendance of routine checkups to the gynecologist. The group of 82 participants provided insight to their own health and presented how these factors have some correlation influencing gynecologist visits.

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Perceptions of Gynecological Visits; Contributing factors to Fear and Anxiety

Women’s health is a complex and important field of study. Routine gynecological screenings play a vital role in maintenance of overall good health but are often underutilized. Engaging in the gynecological medical encounter provides women with an understanding of general health, allows for the detection of various infections, like the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), and equips women with knowledge and tools to prevent disease. Of particular importance is the early detection of cervical cancer caused by HPV. The current study examined factors that encourage and/or discourage gynecological care seeking behavior. Specifically this study examined correlations between how fear, embarrassment, cost, history of sexual abuse, transportation challenges, social stigmas, and access to care are associated with gynecological care seeking behavior. Additionally, this study looked at difference between care seeking behavior and race. Participants were recruited via social media and ranged in age from 18 to 26. A total of (n=82) participants completed an online quantitative link style survey. Results revealed that majority of the participants identified themselves as Black or African-American, with 56% and 39% of the participants identified themselves as White or Caucasian. When the participants were asked if they currently have health insurance 98% answered yes and 3% answered no; examining this factor gave insight to a possible limitation to gynecological visits. Participants were asked how often they make an appoint to their gynecologist 29% answered never, and 44% of the respondents answered once a year acknowledging their commitment to a routine physical with their gynecologist. This research study was developed to see if certain factors such as; fear, embarrassment, sexual abuse, cost, transportation, and certain ethnicities negatively influence the attendance of routine checkups to the gynecologist. The group of 82 participants provided insight to their own health and presented how these factors have some correlation influencing gynecologist visits.