Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Junior

Institution

Kentucky Community and Technical College System

KY House District #

15 & 4

KY Senate District #

6 & 3

Department

Dept. of Science

Abstract

Abstract 1:

Making AND Breaking: How reliable are some water pipes?

Ashley C. Greene.

Three different types of pipes were tested to see at what point in time they would break. The pipes, PVC pipe, PEX pipe, and CPVC pipe, were filled with water and attached to a helium filled weather balloon. The ends of the pipes were sealed to trap the water inside. The pipes were secured onto a payload in a Styrofoam box surrounded by cheese cloth. This frame secured the pipes and ensured that they stayed in one place and could not move around the container. The balloon and payload were then released and climbed approximately 92,000 feet above the original point of launch. The purpose of the experiment was to test the reliability of the pipes by way of stress through expansion pressure caused by the frozen water. It was predicted that the pipes would burst due to the pressure provided by higher altitude and colder temperatures of around -50 degrees Celsius. The pipes are not made to withstand temperatures and altitudes such as these. Only the CPVC pipe broke under the stress that near space provided.

Abstract 2:

Solar Charged 9V Batteries Sent to Stratosphere VS Solar Charged Batteries on the Ground

Theresa M. Palandro

The balloon satellite, filled with helium, carried diverse payloads weighing under 12 pounds all together and it ascended about 92,000 feet above ground. In one of the experiments on the payload, a set of 9V batteries was insulated, attached to a solar panel, and sent into near space. The purpose of the experiment was to test if that sending solar powered batteries into near space would generate a greater voltage than the control set of batteries. The difference in voltage of 9V lithium batteries between the ones on the ground and the ones sent into the stratosphere charged by solar power was studied. After the payload was retrieved, the voltage of the batteries were measured with a voltmeter and compared to the voltage of the control set of batteries that were attached to a solar panel on the ground. Results failed to authenticate the hypothesis. The control set generated a voltage of 7.35 V and the variable set attained a voltage of 7.16 V. The results were affected by outside variables when the payload landed.

 

The Effects of the Stratosphere on Materials

Abstract 1:

Making AND Breaking: How reliable are some water pipes?

Ashley C. Greene.

Three different types of pipes were tested to see at what point in time they would break. The pipes, PVC pipe, PEX pipe, and CPVC pipe, were filled with water and attached to a helium filled weather balloon. The ends of the pipes were sealed to trap the water inside. The pipes were secured onto a payload in a Styrofoam box surrounded by cheese cloth. This frame secured the pipes and ensured that they stayed in one place and could not move around the container. The balloon and payload were then released and climbed approximately 92,000 feet above the original point of launch. The purpose of the experiment was to test the reliability of the pipes by way of stress through expansion pressure caused by the frozen water. It was predicted that the pipes would burst due to the pressure provided by higher altitude and colder temperatures of around -50 degrees Celsius. The pipes are not made to withstand temperatures and altitudes such as these. Only the CPVC pipe broke under the stress that near space provided.

Abstract 2:

Solar Charged 9V Batteries Sent to Stratosphere VS Solar Charged Batteries on the Ground

Theresa M. Palandro

The balloon satellite, filled with helium, carried diverse payloads weighing under 12 pounds all together and it ascended about 92,000 feet above ground. In one of the experiments on the payload, a set of 9V batteries was insulated, attached to a solar panel, and sent into near space. The purpose of the experiment was to test if that sending solar powered batteries into near space would generate a greater voltage than the control set of batteries. The difference in voltage of 9V lithium batteries between the ones on the ground and the ones sent into the stratosphere charged by solar power was studied. After the payload was retrieved, the voltage of the batteries were measured with a voltmeter and compared to the voltage of the control set of batteries that were attached to a solar panel on the ground. Results failed to authenticate the hypothesis. The control set generated a voltage of 7.35 V and the variable set attained a voltage of 7.16 V. The results were affected by outside variables when the payload landed.

 

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