Poster Title

Surveillance of air microbial content in the campus of Kentucky State University

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Institution

Kentucky State University

KY House District #

CD8

KY Senate District #

CD8

Department

Biology

Abstract

To determine if there is a pattern of microbial contamination in air in a confined space such as a campus setting, we have conducted a long-term longitudinal indoor air microbial quality survey. Surveyed areas include hallways, library, and restrooms. Sedimentation method was adopted for simplicity and reproducible. Nutrient agar plates were distributed at strategic areas, and environmental conditions such as ambient air temperature and humidity were recorded. Other factors such as the volume of traffic and/or occupancy were noted. After exposure for an hour, the plates were then incubated at 37 C for 24 h. The number of colonies were counted, and representative colonies were further sub-cultured and/or Gram-stained to determine the microbial species. Longitudinal data analysis and multifactorial analysis were used to determine if there were correlations between number of colony-forming unit (CFU) to parameters such as seasonality, traffic, and ambient temperature and humidity. Several statistically significant observations were noted. For example, during the winter of 2015-2016, the month of March had a higher microbial content, and as expected, a higher usage of the restroom resulted in higher CFU in the collecting plates. Further breakdowns and analysis of our results will be presented. A long-term goal is to determine if the pattern of microbial contamination correlates to environmental parameters such as temperature and humidity. An implicit goal is to determine if there is a correlation to student absenteeism due to respiratory tract infection.

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Surveillance of air microbial content in the campus of Kentucky State University

To determine if there is a pattern of microbial contamination in air in a confined space such as a campus setting, we have conducted a long-term longitudinal indoor air microbial quality survey. Surveyed areas include hallways, library, and restrooms. Sedimentation method was adopted for simplicity and reproducible. Nutrient agar plates were distributed at strategic areas, and environmental conditions such as ambient air temperature and humidity were recorded. Other factors such as the volume of traffic and/or occupancy were noted. After exposure for an hour, the plates were then incubated at 37 C for 24 h. The number of colonies were counted, and representative colonies were further sub-cultured and/or Gram-stained to determine the microbial species. Longitudinal data analysis and multifactorial analysis were used to determine if there were correlations between number of colony-forming unit (CFU) to parameters such as seasonality, traffic, and ambient temperature and humidity. Several statistically significant observations were noted. For example, during the winter of 2015-2016, the month of March had a higher microbial content, and as expected, a higher usage of the restroom resulted in higher CFU in the collecting plates. Further breakdowns and analysis of our results will be presented. A long-term goal is to determine if the pattern of microbial contamination correlates to environmental parameters such as temperature and humidity. An implicit goal is to determine if there is a correlation to student absenteeism due to respiratory tract infection.