Poster Title

Potential use of transglutaminase in restructuring deboned Asian carp meat

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Sophomore

Institution

Kentucky State University

KY House District #

6

KY Senate District #

6

Department

CAFSSS

Abstract

Potential use of transglutaminase in restructuring deboned Asian carp meat

Jordan Wilson, Lingyu Huang, Cecil Butler, Changzheng Wang,

College of Agriculture, Food Science and Sustainable Systems, Kentucky State University, Frankfort, KY 40601

Bighead and silver carp, commonly called Asian carp, are non-native fish that have negatively impacted North American waters including Kentucky rivers and lakes. Harvesting Asian carp for human consumption has been proposed as one of the tools to reduce or eliminate Asian carp from Kentucky waters. Intramuscular bones in Asian carp has to be removed in order to attract American consumers. However, the process of mechanical deboning Asian carp destroys the structure of the fish muscle, limiting the options of products forms that can be made from Asian carp meat. Transglutaminase has been used in the meat industry to restructure beef or pork from small pieces of meat. The objective of this project was to determine if transglutaminase could be used to form fillets from deboned carp meat. Asian carp captured from Mississippi River were deboned and ground through 5mm screen by a commercial fish processor. Samples of Asian carp mince were mixed with 0, 0.3, 0.6 or 1.2 g of transglutaminase enzyme in Ziploc bags. The force required to cut through the slice was used as the indicator of the strength of the reconstructed meat. The color of the meat was measured with a Minolta chroma meter (model CR-400). The slices were weighed before and after boiling at 100 C for 1 min, and the cooking loss was calculated as the weight difference divided by the initial weight expressed as a percent of the initial weight. The force required to cut through the meat increased, whereas the cooking loss tended to increase as the amount of transglutaminase increased. The results suggest that that the enzyme may be used to reconstruct deboned Asian carp meat.

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Potential use of transglutaminase in restructuring deboned Asian carp meat

Potential use of transglutaminase in restructuring deboned Asian carp meat

Jordan Wilson, Lingyu Huang, Cecil Butler, Changzheng Wang,

College of Agriculture, Food Science and Sustainable Systems, Kentucky State University, Frankfort, KY 40601

Bighead and silver carp, commonly called Asian carp, are non-native fish that have negatively impacted North American waters including Kentucky rivers and lakes. Harvesting Asian carp for human consumption has been proposed as one of the tools to reduce or eliminate Asian carp from Kentucky waters. Intramuscular bones in Asian carp has to be removed in order to attract American consumers. However, the process of mechanical deboning Asian carp destroys the structure of the fish muscle, limiting the options of products forms that can be made from Asian carp meat. Transglutaminase has been used in the meat industry to restructure beef or pork from small pieces of meat. The objective of this project was to determine if transglutaminase could be used to form fillets from deboned carp meat. Asian carp captured from Mississippi River were deboned and ground through 5mm screen by a commercial fish processor. Samples of Asian carp mince were mixed with 0, 0.3, 0.6 or 1.2 g of transglutaminase enzyme in Ziploc bags. The force required to cut through the slice was used as the indicator of the strength of the reconstructed meat. The color of the meat was measured with a Minolta chroma meter (model CR-400). The slices were weighed before and after boiling at 100 C for 1 min, and the cooking loss was calculated as the weight difference divided by the initial weight expressed as a percent of the initial weight. The force required to cut through the meat increased, whereas the cooking loss tended to increase as the amount of transglutaminase increased. The results suggest that that the enzyme may be used to reconstruct deboned Asian carp meat.