Poster Title

Polyculture of Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, and juvenile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, in indoor biofloc aquaculture systems

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Institution

Kentucky State University

KY House District #

57

KY Senate District #

7

Department

Aquaculture

Abstract

Polyculture of Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, and juvenile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, in indoor biofloc aquaculture systems

NATHAN A. KRING* and ANDREW J. RAY, Division of Aquaculture, Kentucky State University, Land Grant Program, Frankfort KY 40601.

Biofloc aquaculture systems contain a dense community of microorganisms in the water column which is responsible for maintaining water quality and can provide supplemental feed for animals. These systems use very little water and allow for inland production of marine animals, as salt can be conserved. This study examined the effects of juvenile tilapia (O. nilotictus) on the water quality and production of marine shrimp (L. vannamei) in biofloc systems. Eight sets of two tanks were used with one tank raised above the other, shrimp were stocked in all eight of the raised tanks while only four of the lower tanks were stocked with tilapia, creating two treatments: one with tilapia and one without. Water was constantly pumped between each pair of tanks. Shrimp were fed a commercial diet while tilapia were not given feed directly; they were left to consume the microbial community. Final data are still pending, but we expect to find that tilapia consumed a portion of the microorganisms, helping to improve water quality by controlling particulate matter concentration. Food-size shrimp are expected at the same time that fish reach a pond “stocker” size, thereby creating two marketable products with only one source of feed inputs. This study may assist in the development of ecologically-sustainable, integrated food production systems.

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Polyculture of Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, and juvenile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, in indoor biofloc aquaculture systems

Polyculture of Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, and juvenile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, in indoor biofloc aquaculture systems

NATHAN A. KRING* and ANDREW J. RAY, Division of Aquaculture, Kentucky State University, Land Grant Program, Frankfort KY 40601.

Biofloc aquaculture systems contain a dense community of microorganisms in the water column which is responsible for maintaining water quality and can provide supplemental feed for animals. These systems use very little water and allow for inland production of marine animals, as salt can be conserved. This study examined the effects of juvenile tilapia (O. nilotictus) on the water quality and production of marine shrimp (L. vannamei) in biofloc systems. Eight sets of two tanks were used with one tank raised above the other, shrimp were stocked in all eight of the raised tanks while only four of the lower tanks were stocked with tilapia, creating two treatments: one with tilapia and one without. Water was constantly pumped between each pair of tanks. Shrimp were fed a commercial diet while tilapia were not given feed directly; they were left to consume the microbial community. Final data are still pending, but we expect to find that tilapia consumed a portion of the microorganisms, helping to improve water quality by controlling particulate matter concentration. Food-size shrimp are expected at the same time that fish reach a pond “stocker” size, thereby creating two marketable products with only one source of feed inputs. This study may assist in the development of ecologically-sustainable, integrated food production systems.