Poster Title

An Analysis of a Chandra Observation of the Galactic Supernova Remnant G353.6-0.7 [Hybrid Poster 1-A]

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Freshmen

Institution

Morehead State University

KY House District #

88

KY Senate District #

77

Department

Department of Earth and Space Sciences

Abstract

Supernova remnants (SNRs) are thought to be some of the most efficient accelerators of cosmic ray particles to energies of approximately 3000 TeV. The particular mechanism of particle acceleration by SNRs, however, is not well understood. To better understand the details of cosmic ray particle acceleration by SNRs, we analyzed an archival Chandra observation of the Galactic SNR G353.6-0.7. This SNR features X-ray spectra dominated by synchrotron radiation emitted by cosmic ray electrons accelerated to relativistic energies. Spectra were extracted from spatially resolved structures within the SNR and fit with a synchrotron model to estimate the maximum energies of the cosmic ray electrons accelerated at these locations. We find that the average maximum energy of cosmic-ray electrons accelerated in these regions is ~20 TeV, far less than the putative maximum energy of cosmic-ray electrons accelerated by SNRs.

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An Analysis of a Chandra Observation of the Galactic Supernova Remnant G353.6-0.7 [Hybrid Poster 1-A]

Supernova remnants (SNRs) are thought to be some of the most efficient accelerators of cosmic ray particles to energies of approximately 3000 TeV. The particular mechanism of particle acceleration by SNRs, however, is not well understood. To better understand the details of cosmic ray particle acceleration by SNRs, we analyzed an archival Chandra observation of the Galactic SNR G353.6-0.7. This SNR features X-ray spectra dominated by synchrotron radiation emitted by cosmic ray electrons accelerated to relativistic energies. Spectra were extracted from spatially resolved structures within the SNR and fit with a synchrotron model to estimate the maximum energies of the cosmic ray electrons accelerated at these locations. We find that the average maximum energy of cosmic-ray electrons accelerated in these regions is ~20 TeV, far less than the putative maximum energy of cosmic-ray electrons accelerated by SNRs.