Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Institution

Morehead State University

KY House District #

73

KY Senate District #

28

Department

Department of Kinesiology, Health, and Imaging Sciences

Abstract

Mastering physical movement occurs through motor learning and experience. Motor development is needed for successful acquisition of sport and other physical skills. A lack of motor skills has been associated with decreased physical activity later in life, which has been linked to a variety of hypokinetic diseases. This study examined motor learning and skill acquisition in elementary age children. Twenty 2nd-5th grade students were recruited through the local school system. Subjects did not have any injuries that would preclude them from performing three basic skills (modified squat, tree, and arm and leg raises). IRB approval, parental consent, and student assent were obtained prior to the start of the study. Each participant completed a demographic questionnaire that included age, grade, gender, and right or left hand and leg dominance. Subjects were randomly assigned into one of three groups: visual, auditory, or no feedback. Subjects viewed a video that demonstrated the proper form and technique for each of the three movements. After a light warm-up, each subject performed each of the movements 12 times while receiving feedback based on their group. Each subject was asked to give self-efficacy feedback on how confident they were that they could master each movement before the movements began and then after trials 4, 8, and 12. At the end of the trials, subjects were asked an open response question regarding their experience. The research team determined at what trial, if at all, mastery was met for each movement based on specific set of skill requirements. Statistical analysis determined if differences in mastery existed based on feedback mechanisms, self-efficacy, or other demographic data. This project was supported by the MSU Undergraduate Research Fellowship.

 

Motor development and skill acquisition in elementary aged students

Mastering physical movement occurs through motor learning and experience. Motor development is needed for successful acquisition of sport and other physical skills. A lack of motor skills has been associated with decreased physical activity later in life, which has been linked to a variety of hypokinetic diseases. This study examined motor learning and skill acquisition in elementary age children. Twenty 2nd-5th grade students were recruited through the local school system. Subjects did not have any injuries that would preclude them from performing three basic skills (modified squat, tree, and arm and leg raises). IRB approval, parental consent, and student assent were obtained prior to the start of the study. Each participant completed a demographic questionnaire that included age, grade, gender, and right or left hand and leg dominance. Subjects were randomly assigned into one of three groups: visual, auditory, or no feedback. Subjects viewed a video that demonstrated the proper form and technique for each of the three movements. After a light warm-up, each subject performed each of the movements 12 times while receiving feedback based on their group. Each subject was asked to give self-efficacy feedback on how confident they were that they could master each movement before the movements began and then after trials 4, 8, and 12. At the end of the trials, subjects were asked an open response question regarding their experience. The research team determined at what trial, if at all, mastery was met for each movement based on specific set of skill requirements. Statistical analysis determined if differences in mastery existed based on feedback mechanisms, self-efficacy, or other demographic data. This project was supported by the MSU Undergraduate Research Fellowship.