Poster Title

Using Rapid Staphylococcus aureus Tests to Reduce the Use of Wide‐Spectrum Empiric Antibiotics of S. aureus Infections in Periprosthetic Joint Infections

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Secondary School

Institution

Project Lead The Way - Kentucky

KY House District #

85

KY Senate District #

15

Abstract

As periprosthetic joint infections, PJIs, are increasing with the number of total joint arthroplasties, the efficiency of diagnosing and treating them also needs to increase. A periprosthetic joint infection is an infection that occurs directly on or in the surrounding tissue of the implanted prosthesis. Before determining which empiric antibiotic can be given to the patient, a wide spectrum antibiotic is used to control the growth of the infection until further testing can be done. Periprosthetic joint infections are some of the most challenging and frequent complications after lower extremity arthroplasty. This investigation proposes a method to quickly and effectively identify the absence or presence of S. aureus or MRSA, the most common antibiotic resistant strain in PJIs, leading to faster and more effective treatment. In this proposed test, Protein A antigens found when Staphylococcus aureus is causing the infection are detected in a test similar to a rapid strep test. A way to test for antibiotic resistant bacterial strains would contribute to an improved outcome for the patient.

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Using Rapid Staphylococcus aureus Tests to Reduce the Use of Wide‐Spectrum Empiric Antibiotics of S. aureus Infections in Periprosthetic Joint Infections

As periprosthetic joint infections, PJIs, are increasing with the number of total joint arthroplasties, the efficiency of diagnosing and treating them also needs to increase. A periprosthetic joint infection is an infection that occurs directly on or in the surrounding tissue of the implanted prosthesis. Before determining which empiric antibiotic can be given to the patient, a wide spectrum antibiotic is used to control the growth of the infection until further testing can be done. Periprosthetic joint infections are some of the most challenging and frequent complications after lower extremity arthroplasty. This investigation proposes a method to quickly and effectively identify the absence or presence of S. aureus or MRSA, the most common antibiotic resistant strain in PJIs, leading to faster and more effective treatment. In this proposed test, Protein A antigens found when Staphylococcus aureus is causing the infection are detected in a test similar to a rapid strep test. A way to test for antibiotic resistant bacterial strains would contribute to an improved outcome for the patient.