Poster Title

Maternal Nicotine Exposure Prior to and during Pregnancy and Nursing Increases Offspring Obesity Risk

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Sophomore

Institution

University of Kentucky

KY House District #

39

KY Senate District #

22

Department

Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences

Abstract

Maternal Nicotine Exposure Prior to and during Pregnancy and Nursing Increases Offspring Obesity Risk

Joshua D. Preston1, Leryn J. Reynolds1, Sara N. Tenlep1, Keegan W. Sammons1, James R. Pauly2, and Kevin J. Pearson1

1Pharmacology & Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY

2College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY

Smoking during pregnancy remains a pervasive problem in the state of Kentucky despite the well-known negative effects. In a pilot study performed by our lab, we found that over 30% of women who delivered at UK Chandler Hospital admitted to smoking during pregnancy. Recent research shows that babies born to mothers who smoke during pregnancy are at increased risk for obesity later in life. Nicotine is considered one of the most deleterious chemicals in cigarette smoke. Thus, we examined the potential mechanisms of offspring obesity susceptibility following perinatal nicotine exposure in a mouse model. Dams were exposed to vehicle or nicotine before and during pregnancy and nursing. Skin fibroblasts were isolated from the pups, grown in culture, and incubated in media that stimulated the cells to develop into lipid droplets. Lipid levels and mRNA markers related to obesity (chemerin and adiponectin) were quantified. Strong trends toward greater lipid staining (p = 0.053) and adiponectin (p = 0.067) expression levels were observed, as well as significantly increased chemerin expression levels (p

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Maternal Nicotine Exposure Prior to and during Pregnancy and Nursing Increases Offspring Obesity Risk

Maternal Nicotine Exposure Prior to and during Pregnancy and Nursing Increases Offspring Obesity Risk

Joshua D. Preston1, Leryn J. Reynolds1, Sara N. Tenlep1, Keegan W. Sammons1, James R. Pauly2, and Kevin J. Pearson1

1Pharmacology & Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY

2College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY

Smoking during pregnancy remains a pervasive problem in the state of Kentucky despite the well-known negative effects. In a pilot study performed by our lab, we found that over 30% of women who delivered at UK Chandler Hospital admitted to smoking during pregnancy. Recent research shows that babies born to mothers who smoke during pregnancy are at increased risk for obesity later in life. Nicotine is considered one of the most deleterious chemicals in cigarette smoke. Thus, we examined the potential mechanisms of offspring obesity susceptibility following perinatal nicotine exposure in a mouse model. Dams were exposed to vehicle or nicotine before and during pregnancy and nursing. Skin fibroblasts were isolated from the pups, grown in culture, and incubated in media that stimulated the cells to develop into lipid droplets. Lipid levels and mRNA markers related to obesity (chemerin and adiponectin) were quantified. Strong trends toward greater lipid staining (p = 0.053) and adiponectin (p = 0.067) expression levels were observed, as well as significantly increased chemerin expression levels (p