Presenter Information

Gabriela D. Talavera-SantiagoFollow

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Junior

Institution

University of Kentucky

KY House District #

CD 6

KY Senate District #

CD 6

Department

Department of Biology

Abstract

Sensory Ablation and Red Swamp Crayfish Burrowing Behavior

Gabriela D. Talavera-Santiago1

Faculty Member: Melody Danley, PhD.2

1Department of Biology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky

2 Department of Biology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky

ABSTRACT

Keywords: Procambarus clarkii, Biological and Behavioral Sciences, and Animal Physiology

Procambarus clarkii, the red swamp crayfish, is considered a tertiary physical ecosystem engineer that creates burrows consisting of a chimney-like opening with several underground tunnels. The ability to build these burrows, or to navigate back to the burrows following a foraging event are poorly understood. Because crayfish are nocturnal animals that typically live in turbid waters with low visibility, crayfish utilize their primary antenna like a blind man's cane (tactile), to locate prey and or familiar landmarks. They utilize their secondary antennules for chemical cues (chemosensory) such as pheromones released by other crayfish. To better understand the role these sensory appendages on the burrowing behavior or crayfish, crayfish burrowing behaviors were quantified after removal of their (primary) antenna, (secondary) antennules, or both. It was hypothesized that removal of these sensory appendages would result in decreased burrowing attempts, or less complex burrows constructed due to loss of these important sensory appendages. Preliminary results show no significant differences among the treatment groups in terms of burrowing behavior (degree of construction, number of burrows constructed, or location of burrow construction). However, preliminary results showed significant differences in amounts of time individuals spent in or out of the burrow, and the amounts of time individuals spent being active without burrowing or not being active at all throughout examination (p-value < 0.05, 2-way ANOVA). Preliminary results indicate loss of sensory appendages may influence the burrowing activity of crayfish.

Share

COinS
 

Sensory Ablation and Red Swamp Crayfish Burrowing Behavior

Sensory Ablation and Red Swamp Crayfish Burrowing Behavior

Gabriela D. Talavera-Santiago1

Faculty Member: Melody Danley, PhD.2

1Department of Biology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky

2 Department of Biology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky

ABSTRACT

Keywords: Procambarus clarkii, Biological and Behavioral Sciences, and Animal Physiology

Procambarus clarkii, the red swamp crayfish, is considered a tertiary physical ecosystem engineer that creates burrows consisting of a chimney-like opening with several underground tunnels. The ability to build these burrows, or to navigate back to the burrows following a foraging event are poorly understood. Because crayfish are nocturnal animals that typically live in turbid waters with low visibility, crayfish utilize their primary antenna like a blind man's cane (tactile), to locate prey and or familiar landmarks. They utilize their secondary antennules for chemical cues (chemosensory) such as pheromones released by other crayfish. To better understand the role these sensory appendages on the burrowing behavior or crayfish, crayfish burrowing behaviors were quantified after removal of their (primary) antenna, (secondary) antennules, or both. It was hypothesized that removal of these sensory appendages would result in decreased burrowing attempts, or less complex burrows constructed due to loss of these important sensory appendages. Preliminary results show no significant differences among the treatment groups in terms of burrowing behavior (degree of construction, number of burrows constructed, or location of burrow construction). However, preliminary results showed significant differences in amounts of time individuals spent in or out of the burrow, and the amounts of time individuals spent being active without burrowing or not being active at all throughout examination (p-value < 0.05, 2-way ANOVA). Preliminary results indicate loss of sensory appendages may influence the burrowing activity of crayfish.