Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Junior

Institution

University of Kentucky

KY House District #

75

KY Senate District #

13

Department

Pediatrics Clinical Genetics

Abstract

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to explore the current practice and geographic location trends of physicians certified in clinical genetics, clinical biochemical genetics, and medical biochemical genetics during the 2011, 2013, and 2015 certification cycles.

METHODS: Physicians’ personal data was collected from public internet domains including the American Board of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ABMGG) provider database, the CMS National Plan and Provider Enumeration System, publically available professional-biographies, and university affiliations. The search results were cross-referenced for the greatest accuracy. Geographic location data was plotted onto maps.

RESULTS: Approximately 27% (n=69) physicians board-certified in genetics are currently practicing in non-traditional roles. The physicians practicing outside of the traditional genetics field were categorized as follows: Obstetrics and Gynecology (27%, n=19), Research (20%, n=14), Maternal-Fetal Medicine (13%, n=9), Neurology (7%, n=5), Internal Medicine (7%, n=5), Pediatrics (6%, n=4), or other fields (19%, n=13).

Geographic data determined twelve states have no practicing geneticists, and nearly 60% (n=30) of states have 2 or fewer geneticists from recent certification cycles.

CONCLUSION: Although geneticists practicing in non-traditional roles make contributions to other medical disciplines, these physicians are helping to perpetrate the growing deficit of practicing clinical geneticists. Further discussion is warranted on recruiting geneticists and geographic to improve the quality of genetic services in the United States.

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The Emerging Genetics Workforce: A Study of Physician Geneticists' Professional Lives

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to explore the current practice and geographic location trends of physicians certified in clinical genetics, clinical biochemical genetics, and medical biochemical genetics during the 2011, 2013, and 2015 certification cycles.

METHODS: Physicians’ personal data was collected from public internet domains including the American Board of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ABMGG) provider database, the CMS National Plan and Provider Enumeration System, publically available professional-biographies, and university affiliations. The search results were cross-referenced for the greatest accuracy. Geographic location data was plotted onto maps.

RESULTS: Approximately 27% (n=69) physicians board-certified in genetics are currently practicing in non-traditional roles. The physicians practicing outside of the traditional genetics field were categorized as follows: Obstetrics and Gynecology (27%, n=19), Research (20%, n=14), Maternal-Fetal Medicine (13%, n=9), Neurology (7%, n=5), Internal Medicine (7%, n=5), Pediatrics (6%, n=4), or other fields (19%, n=13).

Geographic data determined twelve states have no practicing geneticists, and nearly 60% (n=30) of states have 2 or fewer geneticists from recent certification cycles.

CONCLUSION: Although geneticists practicing in non-traditional roles make contributions to other medical disciplines, these physicians are helping to perpetrate the growing deficit of practicing clinical geneticists. Further discussion is warranted on recruiting geneticists and geographic to improve the quality of genetic services in the United States.

 

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